Tactical Traveler: S1:E8 | Travel Planning and Community Building with Jen Hong

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Jen Hong, founder of travel tech startup Levantr, shares her journey from corporate life to embracing the digital nomad lifestyle. Levantr a blend of Pinterest, Trello, and SurveyMonkey, offers collaborative planning tools and customizable itineraries. 

Jen’s platform fosters collaboration and cohesive communication among travelers, regardless of their planning styles. Levantr’s future features include a Google Chrome extension for seamless research and idea capture. The platform appeals to travel planners and casual travelers seeking inspiration and idea exchange. Jen’s mission is to revolutionize travel planning and inspire individuals to explore the world, one journey at a time.

Highlights:

{03:00} journey from corporate life to embracing the digital nomad lifestyle

{07:33} Levantr 

{22:45} Jen’s mission to revolutionize travel planning

{27:50} Innovative Business Model

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Jen Hong Bio:

Jen is an ex-Uber, ex-AngelList Go-to-Market strategist with over ten years of experience. She designed the initial mock-ups for Levantr and built the business during the pandemic.

Links:

https://travelpassero.com

https://www.instagram.com/my_levantr

https://tacticaltravelerclub.com

Sponsored Links:

https://therootbrands.com/product/zero-in

https://newulife.com/hk/en 

https://trufinco.com 

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John

Hey, everybody. Welcome to the tactical traveler. I’m so excited today. I have a great guest for us, somebody that I just recently met. They have a travel tech startup company. 

It is so fascinating to me—all the people I’ve met through this podcast. We are doing some amazing things in the travel industry, so it’s my privilege and honor to introduce you to Jen Hong. Jen, how are you doing?

Jen

Hi, John. Hello. Thank you so much for having me on. I’m so excited.

John

Awesome. So, you just told me you were in Australia the last time we spoke? Now you’re in Korea, and then you’re heading to New York. I mean, that’s like a nomad’s dream. Tell me a little bit about what you’re doing with all this.

Jen

Yeah, I lived in New York for all my 20s and moved to Australia in 2018 or 2019. I just wanted to take a gap year, and I ended up staying there for two years and was planning on moving back to New York. But with the pandemic, I wasn’t sure, and now I’m just kind of in Korea on my way to New York so that I could visit all my relatives and my families. I also ate a bunch of Korean food before heading back to New York.

John

Yeah. I love Korean food, by the way. I do. I’m more of a Bibim-guksu

Jen

Would you like them to change?

John

You know, I’m a fan. If I’m saying it right, I’m a red-meat guy, so I.

Jen

Yeah.

John

I love that dish. We have a Korean shop here in town, and I always have beef Bibim-guksu.

Jen

It’s a mess.

John

So now you. As you and I were talking, I wanted to give people a sense of what you’re doing in the tech space before we get into it. In a sense, what kind of person are you? I was impressed with your story about moving to Australia and then starting to do some stuff.

Help facilitate your dream. Just talk me through that. That and you know where this kind of started and what you were doing while you were. In Australia, to make money. And then we’ll transition because I want to spend a lot of time discussing your great idea.

Jen

Yeah, thank you. I appreciate that. I think you know. I’ve always been very…

 In New York, I was always in a very corporate environment—large companies and things like that. And once I got to Australia, I just wanted to do something.

So, while I was traveling, obviously, I just wanted to take a gap year because first, I was really unhappy working, you know, insane hours every week, and I just wanted to take a gap year and travel. But I also like taking many courses I’ve always been curious about. 

So, you know, I have to do freelancing on the side, and that’s when I started getting into it. This digital nomad, so to speak, lifestyle, and I first went on Upwork and started looking for gigs. Honestly, a lot of things happen by chance. If you can believe that, like I was, one of the projects I won was because I was trying to hire. Manners design agency for my startup, as I started to like working on it once I started working on the product design. 

And you know, after speaking to them, they were way out of my budget, and they wanted to hire me as a go-to-market consultant. So, things like that happened because I was just pursuing. I guess I kind of projected certain energy out of things I was passionate about. Many of these projects, work opportunities, and learning opportunities I’ve encountered in the past two years or so happened by luck.

John

Yeah. And I mean, there’s no to me. At least there’s no question that when you’re in the right place, at least mentally, maybe spiritually, it just seems like, you know, God, the universe, karma, whatever you want to call it, really does align things for your benefit as long as you’re properly Blind. I’ve just talked to so many people who share that same story. 

And you know, to be honest, many people have a story like yours: They’re fed up with the corporate lifestyle. They hate it; it brings them no joy. Maybe they’re making great money, but they’re miserable doing it. 

I’m a little older, but I think of myself as at least young. But I see that beginning to happen with the younger generation, where they’re like, why am I slaving away for these people for money that I can’t even really spend because I can’t ever get out of the office to do anything? Would you say that’s your experience as well?

Jen

I think I’m in the transitional millennial category, somewhere in between. There’s fear. It’s scarier. At least I had to deal with my fear in that aspect because. 

But you know, to be honest, yes. I think millennials change jobs frequently, and I don’t necessarily believe that’s because they can’t commit or are entitled. I think it’s because millennials, as millennials, really try to believe in learning opportunities. We want all of you to know that many millennials have side hustles, jobs, and projects. 

So, I think it’s all about people. Just as we all evolve with the technologies and trends, we are all growing much faster.

John

Yeah. Yeah. So, you have this, which, as we talked before the call, I, I love you, have this great idea for a, basically, for lack of better language, at least on my end, a social media platform to help people with travel. 

And before we get into what it all does, please tell me how that became a thing for you. Where did this idea get born? What happened in your life that was the catalyst that caused you to go from a corporate job? That was probably really stable and good. And hey, I’m just going to throw everything to the wind, start my own thing, and see what happens.

Jen

Yeah. Great question, and there are a lot of differences. Just that kind of came together, but I think it really kind of started with the fact that I—I don’t know if I mentioned—was born in Seattle and grew up in Cali, but I also, you know, my parents are Koreans, and they wanted to move back to Korea. 

So, I moved with them and then went to an International School. So I was, you know, our school for those who don’t know what an International School is. It’s basically like a credited American school in foreign countries. 

So, many of the kids are like diplomats, kids, and, you know, American military base kids and things like that. And what’s interesting is that I was exposed to 48 different ethnicities at such a young age; many of my friends were from all these different countries. And being exposed to that level of diversity in, you know, the global environment, I think, shaped how I think. And kind of implanted this insatiable desire to explore every part of the globe. 

And so, you, let’s just say I like traveling. Yeah, and The thing is, if you know, obviously when I like traveling, but most people like traveling, let’s be real, right? But it’s not just that I always tend to play the planner role. I like initiating group trips. I love, you know, traveling with friends. Logistically, it’s a nightmare, but I do enjoy, you know, traveling with people, people I love. 

And one thing that I kind of realized was actually when I left New York, so like, I’ve always kind of wanted to, you know, build a tool that helps, like, you know, helps me, like, plan trips better with, you know, friends and family. But the concept of this whole startup really kind of came together when I left. New York, and my best friend gave me this book called The Alchemy. I don’t know. 

So basically, it’s a book about a boy, right? He is a shepherd, and he likes traveling. And he’s given, like, you know, told that there’s a treasure in Egypt, so he travels much further than he’s comfortable with and goes on all these detours in life because he’s distracted. And it takes him a while to get there, and he almost gives us a few times until he gets there, and he calls it following his personal. And Levantr, by the way, is the name of this wind throughout the book that nudges him to keep going every time he’s about to give up by, like bringing him like scent of like, a woman he loves or scent of, you know, some reminding him of his mission, you know.

John

That part is fascinating. I love that.

Jen

Yeah. So, it’s when I read that book, and my best friend gave me that book when I left New York because she wanted to say, you know, do not give up; do not question yourself. Keep going. Follow this path. Follow your curiosity and then figure out what you need to do and what you want to do, and so that book became my favorite book.

When I was kind of doing, you know, soul searching, so to speak, during my travels. During my gap year, I realized that, you know, I love traveling so much, and I think that you can’t reach your full potential until you’ve taken a lot of these journeys to these unknown places and, you know, get out of your comfort zone and really kind of challenge yourself. 

And all the detours you take are even more important than the destination itself. 

So, once I started thinking about that and the significance of physically traveling around and going to different places to explore, I realized that I want to not only build a tool but turn this into a company and a brand that brings people together so that we can inspire them to travel further, explore the unknown, and grow from the experience.

John

Yeah. Now you kind of brought it out; we’ll use that as a great segue. So, your platform is called Levantr. And go ahead and explain that to me and to everybody who’s listening. What did that do, and where did you pull that idea from? Just talk to me about the details now. I’ve been on the website

I went and signed up after we talked. For me, it reminded me of an upgraded version of Rd. Trippers. If you know what the app is, yeah. So, I loved it. I was like, OK, this is cool, but share with me what it is for the uninitiated.

Jen

Sure. So, basically, at the moment, it’s a tool.

Think Pinterest meets Trello for travel; technically, it’s Pinterest Plus, Trello, and SurveyMonkey. But you, you know, you come on the Mantel, and then you create a journey on your board.

So, you could say, you know, Miami, my honeymoon, you know, whatever it is the next adventure trip that you’re planning, and then you get three things once you create a journey within that journey. So. 

One is this idea board, where you and your crew can save and organize All your ideas in one place everybody has. This has the same view of what’s happening and the ideas being added.  And when it comes to making decisions like when you should travel and what you guys should book, you can use our custom design surveys. To make those decisions much faster.

We have this itinerary functionality, which you can just drag. What you have saved on the idea board and dragged into the itinerary so you can create this customizable itinerary within just a few minutes, and they’re the these. Those are the main capabilities we have. Vision is going beyond that, and we are adding a lot of this. The UX and UX features are designed to help these avid travelers and travel planners, right?

We have split-screen views to minimize the required back-and-forth or tap switching. And yeah, those are examples of some of the features that we’ve added. We have a note function. So, you can add notes to each item in the itinerary. 

So, if you need to communicate with the whole crew, we have this book; remember to bring your passport and swimsuit or something. That’s the place to be. So, it’s focused on this aspect of collaboration and cohesive communication while traveling.

John

Yeah. Now there’s also, you know, so as I was looking through it, you don’t have to be a travel planner to utilize this platform. Right.

Jen

Not at all. You can be initially, we’re going after anyone whose tool is designed with all these, you know, functionalities because we are trying to support them. You know, type a type A planner, but technically, you don’t have to use the itinerary if you’re not the type of person who creates itineraries. You. You can just, you know, keep all your ideas in one place. We use the idea board itself and plan to add certain functionalities to appeal to all kinds of traveler’s automation, you know, kind of thing. 

So, one thing that we’re thinking of, you know, when you’re doing research, like TripAdvisor, is going on blog sites, whatever it is, and having to copy and paste stuff, right? That isn’t very pleasant. So, we are introducing a Google Chrome extension that kind of captures what you’re researching and auto-saves.

John

Yeah.

Jen

Our idea board includes features that we will introduce so that you can save what you see on social media immediately without taking screenshots.

John

Yeah. When I was looking at it, it reminded me. A vision board for planning, but a vision board specifically for travel just the way it was outlined, you know, but not everybody that will be listening today will, you know, be a traveler and plan a travel planner. 

So, I wanted to make sure they understood that, you know, you don’t have to be a travel planner. You could come and, you know, just be looking at something for you and your significant other or you and your family and gather ideas from everybody else’s. Itinerary. Right.

Jen

Absolutely. So, I’m glad you brought that up. So, I’m like this: we’re going after consumers, not travel like planners or travel agents necessarily, but it could be used by all the, the other aspect we’re thinking of was that you know what you said, like this exchange of ideas. If you know, you know, if you think about when you travel, you know what, what sources or which you know which source of recommendations you trust the most, you think of your friends and your family, right?

So, people you know are similar to you or that, you know people, you know who that know you, that knows what you like, you trust their recommendations of everyone else. But if you ever like, I don’t know if you’ve ever asked friends and families for recommendations when you’re traveling like you get it in all sorts of formats, I’ve gotten in like notes format. Like bullet points in an Excel sheet in an e-mail, sometimes like audio, right? Then there’s like out.

John

A screenshot of their ticket.

Jen

Yeah, yeah. You just have to collate all of them and put them in… then, you know, Google them. Getting those recommendations can do much. 

So, what we thought of was eventually, what you’d be able to do if I had an itinerary, let’s say, to go to Peru. And then yeah, I mean, I went to Peru; I have an itinerary, and I want to share it with you, John. I can just shoot it over to you, and then you will get it on Levantr. You can plug and play Based on what you like. 

Soon, there will be a search engine where you can find other people’s itineraries without their personal information. If they’ve opted to make it public based on your preference levels, you guys, you know, if you got, you know, going out, you know, looking for itineraries of other people who have similar travel preferences. You can do that based on the type of activities you do and things like that. Kind of, really.

Crowdsource ideas in a much more effective and efficient way.

John

Yeah, I love it. Love it. Now, how far are you in the process? When I was on the website the other day, it looked good. I know from talking with you that you have other improvements and bigger goals than mine. But how far would you be? How far would you say you are in the process?

Jen

Yeah, we have our MVP, which is just like the initial, you know, B1 of the product, which is functional and working well. So that’s where I mean, which is a good place to be. We decided to take a little more time before launch to ensure we had all three functionalities ready. 

At the moment, what we’re doing is we have an 18-month road map. That will take us from being a tool to the community I mentioned to eventually becoming a marketplace. We are fundraising and.

John

You’re so smart. I was about to go. OK? This isn’t free. Tell me about money.

Jen

Oh yeah. Yeah. Nothing in life. Nothing in life is free, right?

John

Well, nothing worth anything is free.

Jen

You know. Yeah, that’s true. It’s. It’s, you know, what’s funny is because we’re at the start for those of you who are not too familiar with how, like normally, tech startups work like you have a product, you, you know, you get a proof of concept, you get users, and once you get kind of funding. You get a lot of momentum in terms of having to focus on user growth and then on revenue. 

But we wanted to test the. Our business model idea early on because we thought that not, you know, the business model that we have in mind is, you know, it’s not just for our revenue for us to make money. We think that it’s, you know, another way for us to actually improve our users’ experience at AD. Values to them, their travel experiences. 

But one of the key things, you know, the way I’m thinking about it today, if you think about how travel hacking, for instance, right, you have to, there’s a lot of research that goes into it. It’s almost a special kind of people who get into travel hacking and succeed, right? Uh.

John

That’s me, of a travel. Yeah, that’s it.

Jen

Yeah, you’re that special. You belong to that top 1%, but.

John

No, I’m just special. You know, I’m not sure about the top one.

Jen

I wanted to find a way to recognize that we have so many people who like dreaming about travel and saving all their ideas. I wanted to figure out a way to reward them for that. 

So, one thing I thought of. Let’s say we see a user going to Greece in six months, and you have a few Airbnb and hotels saved off and saved. We will do that as one of our business models, but we’ll say we’ll reach out to those hotels. We’ll reach out to the items you have, you know, if we can, and ask them if they want to offer them to you. Deals. 

So it could be, you know, anything, it could be a discount, it could be a free shuttle. They could get free champagne and 30% off a couple’s massage. There it is. So that, you know, we are getting new deals. It’s basically like an automated travel agent, just that aspect. 

So, we look at what you want, what you want, what you are considering as options, and we’ll go out and get those deals for you. That’s one of the kid’s models.

John

Correct. Yeah. I mean, that would you know? The truth is it’s kind of like what you were talking about to do the travel hacking portion. You know, it takes a lot of time upfront. Now, when I want to go somewhere and don’t want to spend much money, it takes me 5 minutes. 

But it didn’t take me 5 minutes when I first started doing it. It took me hours to figure out how to manipulate flights and get them at the price I wanted. I mean, even today, sometimes that does work. 

You know, the ability to have a platform with enough power to negotiate rates down for people is significant and is all the way. Then, it becomes a self-replicating cycle in which you get more deals. So, you start getting more users, which allows you to get more deals, and then these companies pay you to advertise there.

Jen

Think about it. There are two areas of efficiency on demand. It’s on the user side, and you know the company side, right? Like your point, one is that traveling acting is super difficult to get into and get good at. It gets you to know it’s just very difficult. For a lot of. Right?

So, they’re just looking for deals and end up compromising, having to sacrifice the things or types of hotels, whatever they want, or the flights they want to do, but ultimately choosing something slightly less preferable. And then, they don’t know what’s happening on the company side. There is no good way to advertise such a fragmented market, right?

John

Yeah.

Jen

Nobody’s going to follow a bunch of hotels on social media, right? Not a lot of people. Do that, so. They, you know, what they do is they end up kind of. Their only option is to rely on TripAdvisor and these OTA sites, which pay a 35% commission.

John

Yep, and they don’t get a great deal from it.

Jen

Those sites? Yeah. Also, when trying to offer deals, you have to offer them to many people, so you can’t offer them personally. There’s no personalization available, right? Because you’re offering to the masses, there’s no personalization available. 

You know, by kind of looking at instead of, so looking at these gaps on both sides, you know, what I thought of was what if we just kind of flip it and focus on what the users are thinking and doing want and then going to the hotels and providers. And companies to see what they want to offer because a lot of times, you know, let’s, I’ll just stick with the hotel as an example. 

They are open to providing deals; sometimes, it’s not about discounts. For example, if you’re having a bachelor party, the hotels are willing to offer you five bottles of champagne, right? That could be a good enough incentive.

You can do things, and hotels could also be more willing to offer you certain types of deals during certain times of the year because the others have lower occupancy rates or whatever. So there’s a willingness on both sides.

John

Yeah, well, in the hotels, we have far. I don’t know if they have far more flexibility or are willing to be more flexible than airlines. I’ve never seen airlines work with people to help people out; I’ve just never seen it personally.

Jen

I mean, you tried calling them. On the phone, like while things are happening on the ground and if they’re like, oh wait, time is 3 hours, you know like you’re at the airport like.

John

Yeah. Yeah. Well, you know, I’ve got a large travel group, you know, between the two groups I have, it’s almost 30,000 people. And you would think that there’s some bartering ability there. And every time I’ve talked to a hotel, there is every time I’ve talked to an airline, they’re like, go # sand.

Yeah, like they don’t care. They’re like, whatever, we don’t care. And I don’t know if that’s that they have—margin or if they don’t care to give you any. Margin, you know, like. I don’t know.

Jen

Yeah, I think it’s both. I mean, in general, the Airline industry is low-margin, right, very low-margin, so they don’t have a lot of room to play around.

John

Yeah, right. So, you know you’re still in this stage 1, or what do you call it? I called it something different.

Jen

MVP stage.

John

MVP stage. You haven’t rolled out 2.0 and are still in the fundraising process. I don’t want to get into the numbers with you, but what kind of financial investment do you need to take this to the next level? Cause I don’t know who’s listening today, but maybe there’s somebody who can help you guys. Out and needs to know some kind of ballpark figure.

Jen

Yeah. And I appreciate that. But, for legal reasons, we’re not allowed to solicit public investment like investing in publicly announced numbers. But I will say that if anybody is interested, let me know. We have an 18-month roadmap that includes product features like marketing tactics.

John

You’re not soliciting.

Jen

We’re going to hire roles, even ones like influence. We’re going to partner up with costing. We went above and beyond to figure out what we needed to do. You know, completely obviously knowing that at any point we might have to pivot, but A lot of the things that we’re trying to introduce is, you know, this automation capability that I mentioned where the Google Chrome extension, you know, Discovery automation again being able to share our itineraries on our site. 

And when I introduce this kind of deal, finding the right automated travel agent. It is a kind of matching between hotels and willing to offer deals and users. It also likes introducing different ways to help you know companies advertise but also helps users find good ideas, right? Based on the types of activities you have saved. We can suggest different activities and itineraries and partner with that influencer on our horizon. We already have a few influencers we’re collaborating with so that they can host their itineraries that you can download.

 I think I can go on for hours and hours. We have a long, four-page list of features that we want to introduce later. Fine.

John

Oh, nice. Yeah. Nice. Now, without giving away your special sauce, maybe talking about generalities. What kind? What features would those be?

Jen

So, in addition to the ones I just mentioned, there are a few things, like features. When you say features, are you referring to features for users or features for companies?

John

Kind of.

Jen

All of them.

John

You said you’ve got some things on your mind over the next year.

Jen

Yeah, yeah, I can. I can shoot out so few things. So, one is the ability for influencers to, you know, bloggers who said that? Series to have analytics on like number of downloads, right and the shares and then beyond just eyeballs and having, you know, matching them with different companies so that they can partner up, and then you can kind of do that to get paid per download. So that benefits influencers who.

John

Nice.

Jen

It can get paid higher and benefit companies by giving them visibility over exactly what they’re getting—the return on their marketing investment. So that’s one kind of revenue area we’re looking into feature-wise. You know, we want to create a real community on our platform. 

So, you know the way we want to. We’re going to get into events. We want to partner with our tour operators, or it would be great if we could partner up with something like Yacht Week: Contiki and host events for LEVANTR members. We will introduce our reward system, which means that if you’re a Love Enter member, you’re traveling. 

Let’s say you’re in Greece. We’d like to find a yoga studio, and then you get free yoga if you’re a Levantr member. Something like that so that you start, we build a strong community, network, and relationship with our end users and just throw a bunch of parties. As we start, our communities grow another, something that I was thinking of, this idea of a sharing economy.

We’ll have groups traveling to different locations. If they’re willing, we can host social events for them to mingle, or we could also match them up.

John

Nice.

Jen

So they can like Co rent or Co use, like luxury products. Such as like yacht rentals. You know, like a sorry private jet. If you want to book a helicopter, a villa rental, or whatever it is, get together and, you know, book a club. I don’t know. And eventually and also like. Start to kind of onboard more ancillary services. 

So, let’s say you want to, you know, go to. I was about to say Long Island. I don’t think that’s a good example like Napa for like a bachelor party and you went to, you know, have a higher private car to drive you around. Uh, so that you guys can have, you’ll be able to find your services on our platform. I think this ancillary services idea, I don’t know why, you know. Bigger players haven’t gotten into this space because it’s such. 

John

Wise, that’s the profit margin. So, the profit margin on a tour is maybe 1 or 2%. Meanwhile, that profit margin or cruise is often 10 or 20% with a hotel, right? So even though people like you and I are far more interested in the things surrounding where we stop, the truth is that most of those people are. I don’t have the margin to pay to incentivize a bigger company like Expedia to even look at it.

Jen

That’s true. That’s true. Yeah. Yeah.

John

You know. But I love it because you’re speaking my language, so screw those bigger guys. You just become the big guy when you do it, right? So. Yeah. Yeah. So, I’m going to be an adventure junkie. I mean, that goes through my blood. I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of this app, but it’s called.

Jen

Yeah, yeah, yeah. David, right. Baby versus Goliath.

John

Adventure jumps, and as you know, I thought about this app as I looked through your site. It’s on your platform, so it’s a two-part question. #1. When will you launch your app? And then #2. Is there going to be a place for drug addicts like me who need to go swimming with great white sharks?

Jen

Absolutely. Uh, I’m. I don’t know. I don’t know if I’m as adventurous as you sound like. I don’t think that I’ll be like, you know, swimming with the sharks, let’s say, but because I’m not a terrible swimmer, I love skydiving. I’ll do anything. I’ll do things like that. I love sandboarding.

So if those count as adventurous, absolutely so. I. Absolutely. Like the more like. I think it’s more like niche-like activities and services. Can provide. We will go after them because the more niche items we can have on the platform, the better it is because our users get access to things they’re not normally used to. They don’t; they don’t normally have access to it. I normally don’t want to get into this SEO business if you Google like you know things to do.

John

Right.

Jen

Perth, Australia. Let’s say yeah, because of these, there are the bigger ones, tour companies, or whatever. They’re better at SEO and marketing. They’re the ones you find in the first three pages, right? 

So we’re niche ones, and smaller ones are like you’re unlikely to find them. I mean, I’ve had it. I once found this prison tour in Perth. By the way, that was the most fun prison. I mean, the tour I’ve ever had was like a nighttime prison tour.

I looked at every website, meaning I went from one to the last page of TripAdvisor and everything else, to find things to do in Fremantle, Australia, but I didn’t find it. I only found out because I was on a boat, and the locals I was drinking with told me about it.

John

I was going to say you could have had a prison tour just by drinking and doing something crazy. What kind of prison was this that you, you know? That you needed a tour. They do those for free in America.

Jen

Yeah. Well, I don’t know. I don’t. I mean, I don’t know. It’s also like I don’t think I think in American prison. For some reason, my mind would be a lot more intimidating.

John

Just a message.

Jen

Yeah. I think what’s also funny is they do this tour where you can like, go like you have to wear a helmet and then you like, go by boat and then you go on, like in the tunnel, like underneath, you know, underground and then actually see how the prisoners used to escape.

John

Oh, that’s cool.

Jen

Yeah, I wanted to do that, but it was too late. It’s things like that. But it’s just like, the more gems you find, the harder it is. This is why people try to use Crowdsource on Facebook and other sites. 

Because they know that googling doesn’t necessarily get you, small players normally perform the most unique activities.

John

Right. Right. Yeah. The second part is, do you have a plan for an app? You know, what’s that look like?

Jen

Yes. So, at the moment, we are only on the web; as you know, we are working on mobile capabilities. So initially, you’ll be able to do things by going to our website and using the phone. We have plans to create our native app. But from a priority standpoint, we. You know that that will probably happen at the end of the year. It’s likely, but you will be able to see. You can use our platform and some aspects of our platform and the phone by going to our website.

John

Cool. That’s awesome.

So, if you haven’t read that book, it’s a bit difficult to spell. Why don’t you tell me the spelling of your website? I’ll put it in the podcast notes. And the best way to contact you?

Jen

Sure, it’s. It’s Levantr LEVANTR… The best way to contact me would be on our Instagram page because multiple people monitor the messages, so our Instagram handle is my like. My book, like my_Levantr, or you can e-mail me directly at Jen@ Levantr.com

John

Cool. Well, I appreciate your time today so much. I love the idea. I love the concept of what you’re doing. And if you’re planning on bringing the app out by the end of the year, let’s stay in touch because I’d love to bring you back on again Once you kind of get a couple more things worked out and just kind of constantly get your back in front of the Crowd of people. I have, and I’m going to also talk with you here about sharing it with the groups I have and seeing if I can get through some traction that way because, again, I love the idea. I love your entrepreneurial spirit. 

The fact that you were being and doing all kinds of stuff to reach where you could launch your dream man is an amazing story to me. And I want everybody to hear that because we need people like you to show other people that they can live the life of their dreams if they just take that first step and go. 

So I appreciate your time and Coming on today.

Jen

Thank you so much. Enjoyed. It. Thank you, Josh.

John

No problem. We’ll talk to you soon.

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