Sales Platoon: S1:E13 | Sales, Ethics, and Scaling with Eddie Molina

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John Rankin interviews former military serviceman Eddie Molina, who transitioned from military service to civilian life. Eddie shares his experiences in government, law enforcement, artillery, and writing, which laid the groundwork for his sales career. He also discusses his leadership book, which combines military experiences with civilian life. 

Eddie’s entrepreneurial journey into home inspections involves balancing serving clients and writing. Eddie also covers the importance of mindset, ethical practices, and toxic leadership in the sales industry. 

 

Highlights:

{01:30} Unique transition from a decade in the reserves

{06:00} Key principles behind Eddie’s Leadership book

{14:45} cyclical nature of commission-based work

{16:30} The delicate art of firing clients

{22:30} growth mindset and effective leadership.

{26:30} Ethical practices and proper training in sales roles.

{31:00} Scaling a business.


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Eddie Molina Bio:

Eddie Molina is a dedicated writer committed to raising awareness and supporting the veteran, law enforcement, and first responder community. With a passion for writing ignited during his graduate school years in 2011, Eddie has since focused on two key areas: mental health advocacy and sharing compelling stories from veterans and first responders.

In his writing journey, Eddie has made significant contributions by shedding light on non-profit organizations that cater to the needs of veterans and first responders. He strives to bring attention to these vital organizations through his articles, amplifying their impact on those who have bravely served and sacrificed for their communities.

As Eddie’s writing evolved, he became interested in high-profile interviews, particularly with first responders and veterans. Whether it’s highlighting individuals who have overcome daunting challenges, pursued justice on an international scale, or achieved remarkable success as authors, Eddie is dedicated to sharing their inspiring stories with the world.

With a background in the military, Eddie served in the reserves for ten years and deployed to Iraq in 2008. His firsthand experiences have fueled his passion for supporting fellow service members and advocating for their well-being through his writing.

Through his work, Eddie aims to honor the bravery and sacrifice of veterans, law enforcement officers, and first responders while raising awareness of their unique challenges. Join Eddie on his journey as he explores the incredible stories and important issues that shape the lives of those who selflessly serve our communities.

 

Links: 

https://eddiemolina.com

https://buyherostuff.com 

https://www.instagram.com/edbluemagazine 

https://www.mysalesplatoon.com

 

Sponsored Links:

https://therootbrands.com/product/zero-in

https://newulife.com/hk/en 

https://trufinco.com 

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John

Welcome to the sales between podcasts, where strategy meets storytelling. We’re at the crossroads of the battlefield and the business front. I’m your host, John Rankin, bringing you all the tactics, triumphs, and truths from the trenches of sales and business.

In today’s episode, guys, we have something special for you. Our guest, Edward Molina, will help us decode the secrets of service in sales. Edward or Eddie?

Eddie

It’s Eddie.

John

OK, Eddie Molina is a published author and has been in sales forever. I’m so excited to meet you, man. Everybody recommended you to the show, which I’ve never heard of before. So, when I put that out in the tribe, everybody started tagging you. I was like, how have I not heard of this? Yeah. So, tell me a little about yourself and your service, and then we’ll dig into your sales experience.

Eddie

Yeah, just pick up where we left off on the pre-call, which was, you know, I was in the reserve for ten years. I deployed to Iraq in 2008 nine.

So, my transition wasn’t as traditional as going straight from many years of active duty to civilian life in one day. 

So, we were kind of accustomed to that. The training environment goes back to civilians, the civilian world, and back and forth. Yeah. So, uh, you know, for me, it was a little bit different; I will say when we were deployed, transitioning back into normal life was the challenge because, you know, you just get used to everything you know. I remember saying to myself, Man, I have to pay for a child, and I have to pay for the gym.

John

Sure.

Eddie

I have to pay for all these things. This is ********, you know.

John

Right, so what did you do in the reserves?

Eddie

I started as a combo guy, became an artillery officer, and then finished there.

John

All right, you did ten years there; what year did you start, and then you had your two deployments? What year did you finish?

Eddie

I got in ‘99 and did a few years there. I wasn’t a very good guard soldier, and this was pre-911 days, so I missed a lot of trials. I was young; I was in my teens. You know, I didn’t know. I didn’t have that. Responsibility was ingrained in me. 

After I got out, they let me go, and then I decided, a couple of years later, around 2003, to go back in and do It right the second time. I matured, which is an important topic for business and sales. Is that a maturity factor from there? I did it for ten years; I got up in 2012.

John

So, you know, two deployments, that’s like.

Eddie

I was just one. 

John

One, oh just one, from 2000, 2009, OK, and that was Iraq or Afghanistan.

Eddie

Iraq. yeah.

John

All right, all right. And what were you doing in the civilian part of your life, during your time in the guard or the reserves?

Eddie

At the time, I mostly worked in government and law enforcement agencies. And they were very friendly with us, going to training, you know, and accommodating our schedules. So, for us, it’s a little bit easier. 

One of the things I’ve run into in the guard is that there were a lot of soldiers with employer issues. You know, even though the companies that the workforce is supposed to give them off, they don’t make it easier or resent that. I did not have that problem with flexibility, but I saw many guys didn’t. For them, that was a difficult transition every month and every second.

John

So, you’re in the Guard reserves because you started in the reserves and then moved to the Guard. You were Guards and then reserves?

Eddie

Oh. I was in the Guards.

John

Gardeners are always in the garden. OK, so when you were in the guard, you worked in government and law enforcement. At what point did you either start your own business or start in sales?

Eddie

I was in sales before I joined the military the first time around, and that was part of why I didn’t do well with my National Guard in my late teens and early 20s. I missed a lot of drills because of work. I was in sales then and spent about six or seven years there, but it has always fascinated me.

I have always been fascinated by sales psychology, and you know how much work goes into it. That’s why it’s been an area of interest for me. Even then, I read books and immersed myself in the sales process, and I enjoyed it. 

The only challenge in sales is that their employers are usually pretty aggressive with quotas, which adds to the stress. It makes it even harder for them, and their confidence is a little shot when it’s harder than they get. That impacts their sales skills like a self-fulfilling prophecy if you will.

John

Fine. So, so you what? At what point did you stop doing government work and transition into business?

Eddie

Oh yes, that. Was the other part of your question just a few years ago? Just a Few years ago, I left. Yeah, I left that, and I started a small business doing home inspections, which is sales, you know, you’re.

John

Yeah.

Eddie

And the people. And you’re trying to get this client. You jumped on board, and I wrote as I did that. Excuse me, I was writing the leadership book, and then when I finished with that, I was like, you know what? I know enough about sales. 

It was the same process with the leadership. The book is like, let me just throw what I know on. Paper is just a bucket list, so it was only right after COVID. That’s when I jumped back into, you know, I left the government service, and I jumped into a small business.

John

OK, so tell me a little bit about your leadership book. How did that come about? Like, what do you know? And I know because the guard that is different because you’re living two lives, right? Your weekend life and your deployment life are different. 

But how do you go from working in the government to being a guardsman to writing a leadership book and telling me what it’s about? 

Eddie

Yeah, great question. When I deployed, I deployed as a Second Lieutenant, fresh butter bar OC as the training. So, I made all the mistakes that new officers make—you know, the micromanagement, the. And I was following up, bothering people like you, who knew all my mistakes. So, I learned a ton while we deployed. Luckily, it didn’t. Are there any big problems with me? 

So yeah, I learned a lot about leadership there. And then when I went back and got out of the guard, or at least, we got home from the payment, and I went back to government service, I saw many of the supervisors in that agency who just made. They went from lower—line-level staff to supervisors. I saw them make that same transition and then make those same mistakes.

And me, with my experience at the time, I was like, how do you not know? You know you’re making all these micro-management mistakes. You’re not trusting people. And then I saw that pattern. I was like, wait a minute. That’s pretty universal. So that’s where I came up with the idea. 

Let me write the leadership book because everything I learned in the military translates into almost anything—any type of leadership role in the civilian world.

John

Yeah, for sure. So, talk about some of the key principles in the book. You know, I haven’t read the book, right? 

So, I’m always fascinated. When I hear people’s stories of transitioning from military to civilian world work, I, as a military guide, believe that our leadership style, our true leadership style from the military, is much better than anything I’ve seen in the civilian world. 

So, tell me about some principles and how you structured the book. And then what are you doing with the book?

Eddie

Strange enough, the book was just another bucket list item. I had no intentions of marketing because writing a book is easy. It’s marketing it, staying on top of it, and pushing it out, as you know. Just like every other business, marketing is everything. So, I never did any of that. 

So, I published it, put it out there, and let it roam free. But the way it’s structured, it was a mix of actual stories I’ve been through. Combined with the actual lessons from that story, I didn’t want to just write like a recipe. That’s kind of boring, and it had to be more than just stories. There had to be a lesson behind it structured in that way, and a lot of it was. It’s ideal for beginners, like somebody new in a leadership position, but it benefits them because that’s how I went from enlisted to officer. You’re in charge of people overnight. 

So, it was structured that way.

John

I love that you just did it as a bucket list, right? There’s no real agenda other than this, which is what I want to do so that I will do it. So, if you don’t mind, how many of you sold without a marketing plan?

Eddie

About 150, give or take 

Sometimes, I’ll get a trickle here and there, most of them more people I know and people they know; a couple of departments bought a few in bulk, like four or five at a time. I don’t keep track of that. I know the sales, but it’s hard to make a living with writing unless you’re at that peak, Pinnacle, and that’s all you do every day.

John

I know that you’re doing corporate training and stuff like that. Is the book a giveaway offer? How did you structure the actual book itself as far as that goes?

Eddie

Well, for anybody interested that I’m close to, I’ll give it to them for free. People I know, such as business owners. You can benefit from this. It doesn’t cost me much, maybe a few dollars. But that’s it. I didn’t get one of my goals: to do part-time consulting for leadership and sales. I haven’t got there yet, but that’s one of the things I want to continue doing or at least get into this coming year, to be able to; I feel that’s lighter, easy work in terms of, you know, you’re just using your knowledge. But yeah, I plan on using those books. Pillars or foundations of reference: I’m not just saying I know what I’m doing, but here are some examples. 

And you know, if I have a client, I’ll be like here, you know, a copy of each book and read for yourself. If I have what you’re looking for. Once I dig into it, it has to work both ways if you need what my service offers.

John

Yeah, yeah. Regarding the sales piece, you’ve also written a sales book now. Tell me about that one.

Eddie

I had a lot more fun writing about that one than the one I spit out, and it probably took a month and a half of concentrated work every day—a few hours tops because you just get burnt after two or three hours. And I just had fun with it. I broke it down into nine pillars, which apply to every sales industry. Each pillar may have one that applies to one industry and less to another.

You know, but all nine of those pillars apply to every sales gig. It’s kind of like the leadership book: I can spend one. I can write an entire book on body language and how that rolls into the sales process. But it’s body language with just one of those nine pillars. Then, I went on to communication, organization, and so on.

John

OK.

Eddie

It is broken down into those nine individual pillars with some basic examples and a basic understanding.

John

What did you call Your sales book?

Eddie

I forgot to put the nine pillars of sales update on my background behind me, yeah.

John

Yeah, not on your background. Your leadership one is OK now. Are these hard facts or just eBooks or books, physical books, or just eBooks?

Eddie

eBooks and paperback.

John

E-books, Paper bag. OK.

Eddie

Yeah, I had the option of doing the hardcover, but I was more interested in just passing the information along than was trying to, you know, sell a nice quality physical book. I like paperbacks because they’re more agile and easier to maneuver. You can jam it in your pocket. You know what I mean? It’s to me. It’s not a collectible piece. It’s more of a resource. So, I intend for people to use it.

Especially with the sales book, because the sales book has a lot of empty spaces where, you know, I ask, hey, what are your thoughts? Or write down three XYZ, whatever it is, and I will give you space. So, for those books, it’s kind of like a workbook in a sense.

John

Yeah. So, you were doing a home inspection, right? This is a sales position, but a home inspection is not just a sales position in that you must find clients; it depends upon contacting mortgage brokers and real estate agents and developing good referral partnerships.

Tell me about your journey through the sales process. How did you come to a home inspection? Because that’s not a sales career, many people know about it.

Eddie

I liked doing a lot of research while transitioning from government service to civil service.

And I went through different franchises. I was looking at a couple of them, and then I was looking at other business models. I even considered buying a business. I like the home inspection because it’s something that you can do. You can expand from what you can. You know you can start small; you just know you get one client or one realtor, for example. 

Then you work on it unless you make a huge mistake; once you have one in your pocket, you add more and keep building up. And now there are two of us. We do them together, and we combine our companies. So, we work in tandem, making the process much easier and more lucrative.

John

Now, in what state do you do this in New Jersey? So, it’s cold.

Eddie

Yeah, it is. It is now dead time. I mean, like most states, there’s not much going on until, you know, March Pick up. But not many people are buying houses at this time of year, which is fine with me. I supplement my free time with unlimited writing projects.

John

Right. Yeah. The other thing about a commission-only position, like doing the inspections, is that it’s cyclical and not year-long. 

So, during the peak months, you know, probably for you in New Jersey, you’re looking at what you’re doing from March until October.

Eddie

Right, yep.

John

Yeah. You’ve got to make enough for the entire year in a shorter window than most people do.

Eddie

Yeah. And there are jobs that I turned down. I give them to partners, you know, whether they’re too old or in a house that I know will be a pain in the **** with paperwork or too far. Or I could tell the buyers are a pain in the ***.

So, I’m not trying to kill myself with these inspections. I just want to get enough to be comfortable, and then I still want to work on my writing, too, because writing is more enjoyable for me. It’s more of a passion. I enjoy the home inspection. I enjoy the process of talking to people and helping them feel good. You know, helping them be comfortable buying a house and understanding what goes with it.

So, I do enjoy that part, but I don’t want to kill myself by crawling through crawl spaces multiple times a day or through attic spaces. So, I try to find that balance, and right now, I have that.

John

Yeah. One of the great things about being your boss is that we get to fire clients. I don’t want to work with you. I’m like, bro, I don’t see this working out. Let’s not do that to each other. And you can do it.

Eddie

Yeah, and I’ve learned. I learned one of the first lessons. Was anyone who’s price haggling? You usually have a problem on the back end, too. 

So, if they’re trying to bring you down, trying to negotiate, then I say, you know what? It’s fixed. Try this person. They were a little cheaper. And they’re just hunting for the cheapest deal, even though.

John

Yeah.

Eddie

It’s a flaw because they have to look into the value they’re getting, not so much what they’re spending. Yeah, and that’s a big part of the book, too. Is it understanding that value?

John

So, I do sales coaching, and you know I tell people all the time I’m not a high-pressure guy because if I have to high-pressure you into helping you make more money, I probably have to high-pressure you to keep you in when you don’t do what I’m asking you to do and not make more money. So, it’s just like I don’t want to babysit, so if I got.

You know, I’m haggling with you. It’s just like, hey, this will probably not work.

Eddie

Yeah, in a case like that, I and I talk about that. Excuse me. Quite a bit in the book where they’re clients like that. If they’re focused on the price, you haven’t built enough value for them to focus on. What? They’re getting, and they’re and. And that comes from the sales part of it. 

So, one example is because, like, it doesn’t matter if what you’re if it doesn’t matter what you’re buying, for example, but it doesn’t matter if it costs $0.10 if it has no value, it isn’t very helpful. But if it means the world to you. Then it could be prices. 

So, you know, it comes down to value and building that value, which is tricky because you know you have a certain amount of time expectations, but poor is a big one. Sometimes, the chemistry is not. Right. Those are all part of the book’s nine pillars, which I have discussed. But one of those building that value.

John

Yeah. Well, and even inside that, though, is the mindset because the value proposition could be right. But if you don’t have a growth mindset, it doesn’t matter how much or how much value I contribute to you. I just use this as a joke. It doesn’t matter to me that the Pittsburgh Steelers have won 6/6. For bowls, you can talk about their team, tradition, trajectory, and coaching excellence. I’m never going to be a Steelers fan. I can’t stand them. Right. 

So, you could build that institution all you want, but it won’t match me, right? And sometimes, we spend so much time building value in a sales process with somebody who’s clearly in their mindset that it will not be a mat.

Eddie

Yeah. And I think one of the other ones—I think all nine pillars are equally important—but they go up and down depending on the industry that you’re in. One of the ones I harp on is the report because no matter what you’re doing, everything becomes easier when you have a good report. 

And if you have no report, everything becomes harder. So that one’s an art form because to build a report, you kind of have to get away from what you’re talking about and what you’re selling and connect with them on a different level, but then you have to bring it back.

 So, going back and forth that way is an art form. And that’s something I’m pretty good at because I could talk about sports or anything all day, and then I know how to transition back to what we need to do and kind of dabble back and forth. Yeah, that’s the problem.

John

The other thing is. The other thing about reporting that makes it difficult is whether you have a long or short-cycle sale and the product or service costs, right? So, you, you take it, and I always find this strange. 

So, you take real estate or mortgage, right? It is probably the single most expensive decision for anybody. It takes $304,000 / $500,000, right? Unless you’re buying businesses, but if you look at what a mortgage officer or a real estate agent does, how much time do they spend building rapport?

Eddie

It’s unlimited.

John

That’s 38. Yeah, they don’t do that much, right? It’s a 30-day cycle, maybe a 45-day cycle if there are some slight issues with the house or maybe a couple of outstanding credit issues, but you’re in and out of that person’s life, and 30/45 days, it’s a 3/4 $500,000 decision.

And there’s next to no rapport building.

Eddie

Yeah, and it’s. It’s a step-by-step process. I think that. You know, a realtor like that could suffer from a feral business, and I think that the heart of any long-term sales success is that referral network because I’ve seen it in my time, me included. Where? You go from one industry to the next because they work. You, too, like a dog. If you don’t meet your quotas, you’re out. They are just kind. Of repeating that cycle, but if you have That strong network and referral base, that is how you can settle down. And now they’re starting to come to you.

John

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So, you said that you wanted to get into consulting, and right now, as many people are transitioning out of the military, they’re getting offered 20/25 bucks an hour, right? I mean, it’s disgusting to me when you and I know as commission-based guys, and if you just have a little bit of grit and are open to learning, you can make sales and make 65/75 easily.

Eddie

Yeah, it’s not hard. Some are natural, and some can learn. It, I think. There is no one clear-cut answer. But I think the problem is not so much the sales job. The problem I see more often is the institution that controls that sales job because it puts pressure on you, asks you to do more work, and needs you to do well. 

The only thing they. What I want you to do is do even better. It’s hard, and I see many companies cycle through that. They know they’re going to get a young guy; they know. They. They only have a year tops, maybe two, and then they could just continue that cycle. This is the reality of many sales jobs, but it doesn’t have to be some. You know, you are comfortable and lucrative, and you’re not killing yourself with the hours like you have to find that balance.

John

Right. I think that’s where we get into the division between a W2 sales position where you have a manager who checks in on your KPIs or CSS. Who micromanages you because you’re W2 versus the Commission-only role? Nobody is telling you, and you’re not doing enough inspections, right?

You can do your own thing. The second part of this is when we look at it; this is one thing we did in the Army Combative program that I thought was good. And I think it applies to sales. Which is you having this graduated system of rewards and a graduated system of competition, and I think that in sales, I’ve, the companies I’ve seen that do well leave you alone but incentivize you to continue to play the game, right, so. They’re not these task drivers; they’re more like, hey, Eddie, if you want to do well, we’ll give away a trip to Cancun this year.

Eddie

Right.

John

You want to do that and that kind of graduate. We did that in combative as well, where we had these stages where we were incentivizing people to do more because, at some point, that’s all volunteers.

Eddie

Yeah. And I think that’s where leadership ties into sales. I believe they’re connected because you could have great managers and leaders in the organization who could help the salespeople, or they could be toxic, where the opposite is happening. So, I think the function of sales success also depends on the leadership in charge. So, I do believe that they are connected strongly.

John

Right. Well, just sales aside, toxic leadership is the number-one reason people leave jobs in business, period. We live in a world where I can go on if I get fired or quit today. Indeed, I can go on LinkedIn. 

And I can go on these platforms and probably get a job fairly quickly, right? Especially right now with the depressed worker supply. You know, so this is this idea that I’ve got to work for this slave driver that worked in my dad’s day. I don’t see that working out that much now. And I don’t see it in the remote world. And with all the remote sales opportunities working in sales and a sales force,

Eddie

And I know there will always be a need for salespeople, no matter what’s going on, especially in the harder times, because now they’re more like the good ones, who are even more valuable. After all, they’re fighting for something worth less resources. And that’s where I’m not considering what I’ve learned early on—my first sales job.

John

Always. That’s right. Yeah.

Eddie

Helping gas is a New Jersey thing, but I used to try to upsell people. For fun, do you need oil?

Change, or do you need a quarter of oil? How about we do this just to kill time? So I don’t consider that, but the first one was selling gym memberships, and yeah, and then they gave you this three-day crash course, like here’s how you enter a computer and hear the different types.

John

No. Nice.

Eddie

It’s good luck. There is never any training after that; all you get are daily calls. It used to be between 2:00 and 10:00. What are your sales? Was that it? So, there was no follow-on training. There was no rehearsing; there was no. It was strictly about numbers, eventually leading to unethical practices because there was no oversight. There was high pressure, which I’m sure you’ve heard of. You look like you’re my age. I’m sure you’ve heard of—Bally’s Total Fitness.

It was that one. And they were probably as corrupt as you could get, and the reputation followed it. Yeah. So that was one of the other things I was like: we should be doing training. We should be taking this downtime and going through these rehearsals because, in sales, you will see the same scenario repeat itself. It’s just a matter of which one. Yeah, it’s just.

John

Did you know that Patrick Bet David worked at Bally’s?

Eddie

Did you? Yeah, I didn’t know that that was a surprise.

John

He was just listening to his book, Your Next Five Moves. And so, when he got out of the car, I don’t know if you know this, but he was at Fort Campbell, KY. He was in the army. He’s Iranian, and his parents immigrated to the United States to escape all that wazoo stuff. And then he got out and didn’t know what he would do. So, he was into bodybuilding.

So, his idea was that if I worked at Bally’s, I would probably have a bigger opportunity to meet somebody who could help me with my goals. Then he started becoming good at sales and got promoted.

And then they were going to promote him again, and the manager lied to him, so he quit. And that was all that was at Bally’s. And then, you know, he started his insurance agency, and what he was doing there was going after minorities that were Spanish speakers, etcetera, to take what he was doing to the next level. It’s a great book. You would love it.

Eddie

Yeah, I’ll check that out. I know he’s got a lot of good stuff. I listen to his podcast occasionally, follow him, and watch his YouTube clips. Yeah, I’ll do what’s in that book.

John

Yeah, he’s got a good one. It’s about how to make $1,000,000 in a year, and he just does KPIs right, so if you sell, what’s the average in New Jersey on a home inspection?

Eddie

About 500.

John

500 So, you know, take a million. Divide that down by 500. That’s how many sales there were. Divide that by how many months. Divide that by how many days. Here’s what you must do to make a million in in-home inspections.

 So, when he started doing that, he realized the quicker way for him to get to $1,000,000 instead of selling all those policies. It was to build a team. Have those teams sold those policies? It’s a fascinating video. 

His book’s really good. I just got to the section where he talks about being an entrepreneur versus an entrepreneur, what that looks like, and how to use it. He breaks down the statistics of people building businesses inside of businesses and how many of those are becoming millions.

Eddie

Yeah, you know what, and I think you hit upon one important subject: how to make real good money. You only have so much time if you’re working for yourself and by yourself. The real money comes from having other people do part of it and take part in it. But that’s where the leadership comes in. And that’s why there are sales.

It’s so tightly connected that the only way to expand it is to have others do the work for you.

John

You have to have it, and you’ve got to consider the scalability issue. So, let’s dig into that for a second. Because you know you will move into business consulting and sales consulting, how could you and Eddie use it in either the home inspection business or your consulting business? What’s your plan to scale like? What does that look like for Eddie?

Eddie

That’s a good question. Let’s talk about consulting. That’d be tricky because I know that can be very lucrative, even as a one-person operation. I read a book and think I have it for a million dollars. Yeah, I don’t know if you could see it. $1,000,000 consulting. Allen Weiss. He just knows it for himself. He doesn’t have it. He doesn’t even have an assistant. 

But he charges ridiculous amounts, so he values his experience and knowledge, and that’s what. I think I am kind. I liked his system in that sense. I just have to figure out how much knowledge and value I can provide and then put a dollar amount to it. And just to increase it, keep charging as long as people want to continue paying for it.

John

So, scalability, right? Maybe you don’t do that in your business consultancy. Maybe that’s the one-person show. Have you thought through scaling for the home inspection? What does that look like?

Eddie

Yes, we are looking at how to do that, and my partner, who’s just talking to me, does property management. So, I kind of helped him out with some of his stuff.

So, we’re looking at working together a little bit more. We’re just trying to figure out how, and my other part of that is that we do the home inspection stuff with. We’re looking at how we can expand from there because you can hire inspectors right out of getting a license, which is a pain in New Jersey. But we’re still. We are open to the idea on the front and early end of that.

 But the way I have it structured now is. The easier, the more. I’ll do simpler inspections, and he’ll do the other ones. But I’ll do some of the services we call ancillary services in and out in five minutes because then I’m getting more bang for my buck, and I’m not spending much time on them.

John

You have to start thinking about scale whenever you get to that point.

Eddie

For this month,

John

Measuring the cost per hour versus the task, I always find that it comes almost right after you start looking at it. You’re paying me how much to do this? Do I want to do this? I’d rather just pay somebody. Else to do this.

Eddie

Yeah, and that’s kind of where we are right now. Where? He doesn’t mind doing any inspections. I’m. I’d rather you know I value my time more because I do many other things.

But I like to go in and out, spending five minutes and earning a few hundred dollars.

John

If you’re making 500 for 5 minutes, that’s a good day.

Eddie

Situations like that exist, and we’re trying to tackle them. But as far as scaling it, we will consider it once we become busy enough. Right now, we’re kind of working on marketing. What must we do once we get busy enough to justify getting another person and taking a percentage of that? That’s standard for home inspections. Take a chunk of theirs, and they do the rest.

John

Yeah, well, you can probably do 10%, right? So, you just take 50 bucks or whatever.

Eddie

No, it would be a lot closer to, like, 40 to 50%.

John

Oh really?

Eddie

Yeah, because especially when you get the license, the hard part is getting started, because then, like I did that, I did the grind of going into realtor offices, giving, you know, some gifts, and other things—little gifts like ways to connect. 

So, you have to grind. And that takes a good year, and you have to do it. Luckily, I did well with it. But some people can’t afford that. They must start working immediately to get their license and look for a company. That takes ten inspectors because you’ve got to get your insurance anyway, knowing they will take a big hit at her, but at least they’re getting work.

John

Right. So, somebody’s listening to the show today; they’re in the military and will be transitioning in the next three to six months. What do you think the average home inspector makes, and why? Why should somebody consider a home inspection?

Eddie

You know what? It’s a great question because the answer is not simple. You can do well right out of the gate or struggle with it for years and barely get by. A lot of it has to do with the individual, their personality, and their drives. 

So, it’s really hard to gauge your success rate now if you are an employee or an inspector who works for a different company. That’s a bit easier to forecast because they can tell you how many inspections to expect and how many traditions they follow. But if you’re just going at it solo, it can go in one direction or the opposite.

John

Only roughly 3% of people will launch their own business anyway. It takes a pair of Jonas and a little bit of grit to do that anyway, but it. But by and large, if somebody goes out and starts doing home inspections, what can they reasonably expect in their first year of business? Do you think, uh, first year?

Eddie

In business, it also depends on the state. But I would say, like livable money, the first year, if you’re doing the basic stuff like prospecting, you’re visiting realtor offices, you’re following up, you have decent organizational skills, and then you’re not too lazy like you’re somewhat ambitious. You can make a livable wage, you know, between 40 and 60,000 the first year, which is livable in most states, and after that, as long as you’re. If you’re good at. and you build your realtor base. 

Then it will expand from there because Realtors, once they find an inspector they’re comfortable with, don’t want to go elsewhere because they’ll take a huge chance. So, once you score yourself as a reliable guy, that’s one in the books that, you know, you have unless something drastic happens. And then you just keep building on top of that.

John

All right, good. So, we’re going to find your books. What’s the website, and what’s the best way to contact you? Is it Facebook or LinkedIn? Where can somebody go?

Eddie

Yeah, that’s my website. I have my information there, including where the books are. The other writings are there, and it’s myname.com, so it’s pretty busy and easy to find instead of having to search on Facebook. Yeah, instead, I have to search through Facebook or any other.

John

Pretty easy to find. OK.

Eddie

Myname.com is the best way to explore some of my writing and the book. You can also contact me.

John

Well, we’ll put that in the show notes for everybody. And if they’ve got questions about maybe being a home inspector, I’ve had a couple of people come out of the sales platoon, where we train them how to do sales. 

One of our students is in Florida doing home inspections and doing very well. He had already taken the three months we were in the cohort and had been building out his referral list before he started, but he lost his military paycheck. And then, just on the other side of being able to promote,

Eddie

Yeah, there are 14 states.

John

You know, just go to eddiemolina.com, and they can pick up your books or book you for a time to come in and speak.

Eddie

Yeah, anything like that. And get a hold of me. I’m open to all ideas. I’m open to collaboration. Zoom calls are like Picking my brain, and vice versa. Sometimes, I pursue other people. I like what you’re doing. I want to talk to you about it. Most of the time, people want to help. I do want to mention this.

That was what a friend of mine turned me on to. He runs, and I don’t know if you’re familiar with drop shipping. Yeah, he sells. Yeah, he started that a couple of years ago and told me about it over the spring. I’m like, wait a minute, you just put designs on shirts and sell them, and someone else handles the ship. 

So I got into that. And that’s more of a passive thing because there’s not. You can do much more than that. You know, keep adding content. 

So, I started a website where I sell military themes and law enforcement, as well as other themes, such as T-shirts that are also available. I haven’t linked that to my website because that’s brand new, but it is online, as it’s called.

John

She set up a take-out shop.

Eddie

Not yet. I got a little TikTok, but I resisted.

John

You, that man, I’m telling. You got TikTok shops are killing it. Yeah.

Eddie

I’m resisting TikTok, but I know it’s a critical piece of the puzzle, and I do, too.

John

Many people do, especially military people, but I’m telling you, there’s so much income there. And yeah, their data is scraping and stuff like that. But if you’re doing something like T-shirt sales, you need a TikTok shop that’s just about one for any kind of product like that.

Eddie

Yeah, yeah.

John

So, I want to challenge you a little bit.

Eddie

I will. I will grow into that cause. Yeah, I know. I got the store open. And now that I have it, I have it open. I can see the potential of this. It can expand, and that’s just one more Ave.

John

Would you go through fruit with your store?

Eddie

I bought the domain herostuff.com and linked it to the Shopify store.

John

I’m just using Shopify.

Eddie

Right. But it comes up as a website.

John

Shopify now has the potential to fulfill all the fulfillment and make the T-shirts, and you don’t have to do that. I didn’t realize I had gotten that good.

Eddie

Yes, yes, they did. I don’t use Shopify. I’ve stuck to one vendor, which has been fine because they have many more options. But I also stuck to the traditional way because that’s all the YouTube videos that were available at the time, so none of the new YouTube videos explain that you can use Prettify to fulfill an order. 

They all say you must link it to a third party, so I followed step-by-step instructions. All these YouTube videos, and then by the time I learned them, I was like, Wait a minute. Going to fight offers it themselves. Why did I go through this trouble? But I’m used to it, and I will stick to it because the shirts I got from that company, the delivery, everything, and the tracking were all good. 

So I was comfortable with it. Everything seems to be working smoothly. I didn’t want to tinker with it, but not yet.

John

Not yet, anyway. That’s funny, man. Well, that’s good. It’s been great having you on the show. Thank you so much. Again, if you want to connect with him for consulting, his books, or questions about home inspection, it’s just Eddie Molina.com. We’ll talk to you soon, brother. Thanks so much for coming on.

Eddie

Brother. If you need anything, contact me, and I’ll do the same. We’ll stay in touch.

John

Great. Thanks. 

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