Sales Platoon: S1:E11 | Navigating Military Transition and Healthcare Sales with Chuck Meisel

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Chuck Meisel, a former Green Beret with 31 years of experience in the healthcare industry, shares his journey from military service to sales. He emphasizes the importance of discipline, work ethic, and understanding of regimented schedules. Chuck also shares his military experience and role models, highlighting the evolution of military selection processes. 

He shares his successful sales career, emphasizing subject matter expertise and time management. He also discusses the medical sales industry, its mission, and the competitive landscape. In conclusion, Chuck emphasizes the importance of discipline, networking, and industry expertise for transitioning veterans and individuals considering a career in sales.

Highlights:

{01:00} Chuck’s Background Transitioning from Military to Sales

{12:35} Military Experience and Role Models

{23:30} Transitioning to Civilian Life

{27:00} Sales Career and Success Strategies

{30:35} Medical Sales and Industry Dynamics

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Chuck Meisel Bio:

Chuck Meisel is a results-oriented and dynamic sales and marketing executive with experience driving sales teams and accounts to surpass expectations. With a proven track record of achieving revenue and order targets, Chuck has a knack for launching new products and fostering client trust and loyalty through his unparalleled market knowledge and ability to understand mutually defined goals.

As the Vice President of Sales at Surgical Notes, Chuck exhibits his expertise in various areas, including the ambulatory outpatient market, strategic planning, expert presentation skills, team development, mentoring, coaching, consultative selling, and the development of new markets.

Chuck is a skilled leader and an effective communicator who excels in building strong customer relationships. He utilizes his sales insight to provide consistent feedback to his team, empowering them to perform at their best and achieve remarkable results. With a passion for driving growth and success, Chuck Meisel contributes significantly to the sales and marketing landscape, leaving a lasting impact wherever he goes.

Links: 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuck-meisel-0092508

https://www.mysalesplatoon.com

Sponsored Links:

https://therootbrands.com/product/zero-in

https://newulife.com/hk/en 

https://trufinco.com 

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John

Hey everybody. I’m excited to be with you today and our guest, Chuck Meisel, a Green Beret who has been in sales for 31 years in the healthcare industry. I’m so excited because it’s not often that I get to interview former Green Berets, and it’s even less often that they pick the sales path. 

So, it’s going to be a great day with you. I’m excited about it. Tell us a little bit about yourself. I mean, I know that you were a green beret. But tell us about how you came in and then made that transition.

Chuck

Thanks, John. Thanks for having me. First, it’s been a long journey and one with a lot of different directions taken. For me, my dad was a group brain first group during Vietnam. I had an ROTC scholarship that I needed to get after he passed away during my first year of college, and it was always my goal to be an infantry officer or an army ranger and then go into stuff. 

That was kind of the blueprint. We all have dreams and aspirations, but I knew what I wanted to do, whether it’s sales in terms of being the best or being good and taking on the challenges you must face and overcome to achieve those goals.

John

I want to pause there because.

Chuck

Yeah.

John

You know we do. We don’t see this often for your dad to be in SF before it was SF, right? We didn’t call them green berets until right after Vietnam. Tell me what that looked like growing up with a … I don’t want to say real green beret, but you know what I’m saying? Because it was different in Vietnam with the Snake Eaters. So, what was that like, and how?

Chuck

Yeah.

John

What was that? What did you see with your dad during that period that made you want to go to SF?

Chuck

I was born in Okinawa because my dad was in the first group. I didn’t grow up in a career military family because of my dad. And maybe this is the person I became. He got into sales after he got out. He was insured—business, so wasn’t it when you were younger? Are you busy doing your stuff? Growing up, being a teenager, etcetera. 

So, I mean, it wasn’t like he was my mentor and he guided me, but I saw enough, I knew the challenges, and I wanted to do something different. I wanted to serve. You know, as I progressed in my military career, it was kind of like how I’ve lived my life. Hey, from a sales perspective, what’s my goal this quarter? What’s my goal this year? And for me, as a medic in medical sales for the past 31 years, it’s like, what do I need to do? To get to the next step, and some time is. 

So, for example, today, all I do is sell. I lead and manage some, but I’m a sales guy, right? That’s it. Every sales leader should see themselves as a salesperson. You’re carrying a bag. You’re engaging with people daily, but going back to your question, it wasn’t like, hey, I want my dad because he was a green beret. That’s what I wanted to do. But maybe that’s subconscious; that’s what pushes in that direction. I enjoyed being out. I enjoyed the physical aspects of it. Being an infantry officer and a green beret, you know, sucking it up.

John

Well, you served from ‘84 to ‘93, so you served everybody. That was probably your mentor or military leader, who was most likely a Vietnam veteran.

Chuck

Yeah, yeah. I mean, my first team sergeant and most senior officers, who were senior enlisted, had been in Vietnam. And so, do you have those role models to follow?

John

Yeah, yeah. And it was a very different culture back then, right? We talked about it today because we have 18 X-rays, right? But back then, almost everybody was an 18X. For example, some people went straight out of high school and into the pipeline for special forces.

Chuck

Right, right. And it will evolve. Because, you know, I mean, X-rays are still the go-to selection. When I was in, you only went to selection if you had to be an E5 or above. And so, they didn’t have X-rays.

So, all the guys I went through the Q course with and served with, except the senior and listen guys, who had come through and had been in other units. So, they followed the path of going, hey. I was an infantry Squad leader. I was in the armor where they wanted to go up. So, everybody follows a different route.

John

Yeah. So. You were just in the ‘80s and ‘90s because I got out in ’96. I hadn’t served as long as you did, but you were just.

A couple of. Years ahead of me, there was no transition for me. What was it like for you? They just handed me my DD214 and said, don’t let the door hit you in the ***.

Chuck

More or less the same. Would. You know, and we all think back to, hey, when we serve, hey, the army is going to be screwed up when I leave, or you leave. It’s a big machine. It keeps going. And you know, I’m. I’m sure people remember me back in the team room at the battalion, etcetera, but it keeps going on. I mean, that’s life. Whether it’s me or not, if I were to leave the company that I’m at, people would remember me as one of our customers. 

So, hey, what? What happened to you? But it would keep going. The one thing is, we’re all going to be replaced at some point, and you know you can’t look at it as like you. You are single. The element that keeps that company going, and I’ve had you. I know I’ve worked for. Six different companies since I got out over the one year I’ve been at my current company, Surgical Notes, for ten years, and it’s been a great run. 

But you know, when you look back at your career, I think it’s vitally important, and from a transition perspective, I will go back to that. Young men and women who listen will see this. The one thing they have going for them that nobody in the civilian sector has understood is a regimen work ethic—a training schedule.

When you think back to serving, you know what you were doing. You’d seen the training schedule; you knew where you were and what tasks had to be accomplished. That is what you bring. To the private sector because you’re disciplined. Then. You understand how to get things done and work hard; you outwork everybody. If you continue to do that, from a sales perspective, I will think back to one of the guys. I said to talk to one of my direct reports, and I go, you know, it was a Friday. I go, what are you doing? And he’s, like, expense reports. 

I guess that’s what you do on a weekend. That’s when you get that done because this is your selling time. Yeah. If your customers are available, you’re reaching out to them. And then, and again, and again, I’m kind of old-school, and that’s the fact that when I got into sales, I didn’t have a laptop or a cell phone. Right. 

So, it was about getting in front of people and kind of you reaching out to me. This is getting in front. This is the new way of getting in front of people, but it’s not about what I generated.

John

Yeah.

Chuck

Three hundred outbound emails this week that are not targeted.

John

We’re not targeting; it’s a low percentage anyway, right? It might be.

Chuck

Yeah, like.

John

It might help you a little bit, but. I can’t even tell you the last time. I bought anything off an email.

Chuck

When I started and from the beginning of my first job, I saw that I was very fortunate because I went to a company. And we were selling medical devices and products. So, you had to learn it, and again, the young men and women on this call are competitive. No one. No one likes to lose. 

So again, being, you know, up first. Staying up late and studying and learning what you’re selling so you become a subject matter expert again in SF. If you’re 18 years old, echo. You know me. You’re the engineer; you’re the demolition guy. He’s our subject matter expert. He has to know everything about that same thing, you know. 

So, when I look back at where I started and where I am today, having sold devices, I realize that my success in equipment services stems from my desire to get to know John. Yeah, and it can be. It can be little things tied to it. Hey, tell me about your business because every business is slightly different. They’re not all McDonald’s, alright, my customers, and this is a phrase I use. If you’ve been to one surgery center, you’ve been to one surgery. They’re all a little different. Yeah, right. They all have the same mission. They all essentially do the same thing. The result is the same. However, the key physicians are the leaders at that facility. They’re all unique, and their pain points and goals may differ at different times. 

So, you know it’s. It’s been an absolutely fun ride. I’ve learned a lot at every job, and, as you probably know, everyone’s going to encounter failure, and the failure can be not winning a deal, or it could be, hey, that job sucked for a lot of different reasons. And we went in different directions. And we’ve all had those, but everyone… Every position allows you to learn a little bit more.

John

When you started to get to the eight-year mark, nine-year mark, I mean, did you think you were going to be a career guy, or did you know that you weren’t going to be a career guy? You just made the decision. To transition, how did that play out for you?

Chuck

So, I was at the eight-year mark. I kind of did not want to be a major in SF.

Because you’re not the action guy. So, the majors—I mean, they were all good; don’t get me wrong. And friends of mine who stayed in and did amazing things. They are senior officers, battalion commanders, and group commanders. That’s awesome. But for me, it was, like, alright. Alright. Do I go? I went to selection, and I didn’t get picked. So, if I got that, I would say. But I didn’t. So, it was like, alright, what else do I want to do? And, you know, I reached out to go ahead.

John

Well, this would have been. What ’87 ‘88?

Chuck

Now, that would have been like ‘92.

John

‘92.

Chuck

Because I got out of ‘93. Yeah, and.

John

I don’t remember, and we don’t have to dig deep. Are you that delta selection that you went to and didn’t get selected? OK, because now, I don’t remember, there are three or four selections. So, I wanted to see which selection you were talking about.

Chuck

Yeah. At that point, my wife and I didn’t have kids, and it was like.

John

Today.

Chuck

Alright, what? What do you want to do? And I reached out to people that I knew and reached out to. And this is the key part: maintaining relationships.

John

Yeah.

Chuck

Those who got out before you, others you stayed in touch with, people you might have gone to school with, etc. So, I had Others that I reached out to, and one of the guys was a guy I had grown up with, and he had followed me into the army. Hadn’t his stent been as good? However, he got a job with a medical device company in California, where the company hired many military personnel. 

My training class included me, an Air Force guy, and another Army guy. We all had very similar mentalities regarding work. Oh, we respond. Hey, teacher, I don’t know this. And uh. and the three of us stayed friends for life.

So, from our initial training class, kind of like. I mean for. For everyone on this call, this is the important part. You will make friendships and relationships with individuals in every unit. And today, it’s so much easier to stay in touch with those individuals, whether they’re squad leaders or not. Tunes, etc., Or the guys in your squad and staying in touch with them, developing that, and maintaining that contact, not just because you want to remain friends, but what are you doing? What do you like about it? 

That plays into building that network because everything we do in our lives is about connections and relationships, and, you know, it’s a Malcolm Gladwell book. Talk to people; talk to strangers. 

So, I’ll bore you last night. I’m in San Francisco for an orthopedic conference—a younger guy to my right. I go… So, who do you work for? He also said Striker Strikers is a great medical device company. And I go, oh? What? You know what? What’s your background? What were you doing before that? Because they are. Recruit a lot. Of athletes, and he goes, I was in the army. And what’d you do? Where were you at Fort Knox? Alright. Tanker. 

So, you know, here’s this young guy, and then I’m going to bore you again because I talked to this orthopedic surgeon yesterday. He’s a North Beach surgeon towards the end of his career, and he’s from Massachusetts. I said something about it: I used to live out in the air. Do you know where that is? He. Goes. Yeah, 4th Evans.

He goes… The station is there. I go, really, and he was the intent. He was there four years before I was.

He transitioned from military intelligence to medical school and became an orthopedic surgeon. So, we just started talking about the old group commander that he knew that I knew. And you know, it was just an incredibly small world. But I can’t because it is hard for those listening folks to maintain being that connector. It is so vital. I mean, it’s it, and by staying in touch and knowing that this person’s over here and is getting connected on LinkedIn, you have so many more tools. It’s easier, but the key thing is that it’s not just that tax. It’s hey, it’s get on the phone… FaceTime. What are you doing?

And get a bit deeper because it’s a relationship tied to understanding. What? What’s what? What pressure? Someone dealing with our customers is dealing with the same thing. So, you know, how are things going here?

John

No.

Chuck

And that potential customer, that person you’re talking to, will go elsewhere. Hopefully, you’ve developed a strong enough relationship that they’ll contact you when they go to that next company. So, it’s constant, and that’s what I’ve been able to do. That’s one of the things I’ve been very successful with.

John

You know it. It’s not a little cliche, right? Your net worth is directly tied to your network, right? And. This is something that, at least, the army does well. I don’t. I don’t know about the other branches, but they’re trying to force these kids to get on LinkedIn and build their network. And when you get into business, I tell people, you know, there’s not a state that I can go to that I can’t find somewhere to crash. 

There is somebody from my 20 years at Fifth Group, my three years in the Army, or my time in business that I can call and go. Hey, I’m swinging through. Do you mind if I crash at your place when you can do that? It becomes a lot easier. It isn’t easy anyway, but it becomes easier to have a professional career in sales and business because you’ll have a wide network of people to pull on, like a God-checking, who do you know that …

Chuck

Where is it not a light switch? You turn it on and off. It’s gradual, constant, and hard. And friends of mine that I went to school with. They’re like, Chuck, you’re the glue. You. You’re the guy who keeps us all together. And that’s not bragging. It is because you lose touch with some people. And that’s OK. You can’t stay in touch with a million people. 

John

That’s right.

Chuck

But part of it is when they see you again at a conference. Or you’re in a different city or state and reach out to them and say, ” Hey, man, let’s grab a beer. Let’s catch up. It’s been ten years. We’re going to be receptive. You know it’s. That’s what’s been the linchpin for my success. I am in my market when I go to a conference; I am the ASC guy. Everybody knows me, and then so.

But what I’ve been in is a vertical. Whether you’re selling construction or not, I’ve been in healthcare. Cars, any product or service—what’s important is that you can make many changes early. But as we age, you’ve got to identify. In my opinion, that sector is where you feel most comfortable and not jump from job to job, but all those relationships. I can’t. I couldn’t go. It would take me a long, long time if. I would leave. Medical and go to a different industry.

Because all my relationships are in this sector, everybody, I know every story I know is here, and you know what? What I would encourage folks to do is, if you’re starting your sales career, you’ve had a couple of jobs, and you’ve learned some things medical. Is awesome. And the and I’m. This is my space if you were talking to other people you know, such as gas and oil, industrial, etcetera software. 

John

Well, I like that. You know, I think. So, there are a couple of different things here, right? So, first of all, or at least currently, as people transition out of the military, the average is within their first three or four years; they have switched jobs almost every year. Some of that has to do with the length of time that we’ve been there.

Chuck

Yeah.

John

So, your 20-year career?

Chuck

Right. Right.

John

And now you’re going. And I say this loosely, but you’ll get it. It is a sales guy; you go from a completely socialist society where everything is down to what you’re going to eat, what time you’re going to eat, and what you’re. Where to a completely capitalistic society, which is, hey, check your freaking show up? That’s on you. You just won’t make it.

Chuck

Yeah, right.

John

There is no money this month. You know, so. You go from very micromanaged to very micromanaged, and that approach to freedom and that idea of niching down and figuring out who it is. What you want to be is important when you’re handed back all that freedom. I mean, it’s wild. And so, there is a lot of switching, you know.

Chuck

John, Hey. I agree. But I have that training schedule and am continuing that. So, these two are out even when looking at blackout time on your calendar.

John

Yes.

Chuck

I have a list of who I’m contacting, but you must be regimented. Because we’ve both seen individuals who got out, they’re like, man, I got all this time to be on the couch. Well, couch being on the couch. And unless you’re a tick-tock, don’t pay any bills. And so, you, you’ve got a hustle? And it won’t.

John

After hours.

Chuck

And the only thing you control is your time. And is it productive? 

You have the list of individuals you’re following up with that day. If you’re like me and you travel every week, alright. Are you thinking ahead? Hey, here’s my schedule for the next two weeks. Alright. Where am I? Where am I going to be? Who am I going to reach out to now? 

I want to have my base appointments lined up weeks in advance, so when I’m in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, etcetera, I’ve got the key things, and then I’m going to fill in around to see other people. That may not have been responsive, and not everyone wants to see it. Everyone may want to see us, but people are busy, and you have to understand that it may not fit with their time calendar.

John

You know, I do sales coaching. I work with companies nationwide and use sales as a skill bridge for people getting out. And what you just said was so important because I don’t think people realize the top three problems I hear from companies regarding selling more effectively and making more money. Number one is time management. I hear that it probably just edges it out, but probably just a bit more than leads you, right? 

You then mentioned having a regimented and disciplined schedule. Every top producer I know has a very disciplined calendar, whether it’s in sales, athletics, or business ownership. 

Talk to me about that for just a minute. What does your regiment look like? I mean, you’re traveling. So, that regiment has to be flexible, but you still have to have that structure to be as successful as you’ve been. So, talk us through it. That’s what that looks like?

Chuck

I mean. The most successful individuals are still getting up to 0. Dark 30 is all right. Whether you work out early or late, you’ve got to factor in some PT. It’s a young person’s game, and you’ve got to be light on your feet. But going back to what that schedule looks like, I’m in my office when I’m not traveling every morning at 8:00 AM. All right, I’ve already been up. I’ve already gone to the dog park. I’m going to work out at night. 

But, you know, it’s tied to looking at my calendar. I start on Sunday, number one. I’m updating Salesforce and the opportunities that I’m working on. Is the close date accurate? Am I moving leads to opportunities? Everybody has a CRM, but that’s my Sunday evening ritual, alright? 

And then I’m thinking about. Hey, where am I going to be? Who else do I want to see while I’m in town? So, where will I be next week if I’m in LA? Next week? I’m back in Colorado, so I’m home for a week. All right. But I do have appointments with prospects and opportunities in Colorado next week. Those are already on the calendar. 

So, I’m filling in that time, but I’m still carving out and blocking out time in my calendar. Prospecting. And I’ll identify. The. Prospectives on where I’m going to be. So I can fill it up. Around those key appointments, and again, guys, it’s it. It’s not about. Hey, I’ve got to see 20 people a day because theoretically, particularly if you’re driving around in LA, you can’t get anywhere to see every 20 people, and it’s just impossible.

John

Especially. Right.

Chuck

But you know, so it’s. Hey, here are my key objectives. Here are my key meetings, and I am filling them around because maybe that cold call turns into a 30-45-minute conversation, and they want to learn more. You caught that individual at the right time.

John

Yeah.

Chuck

And if you’re next door to a key customer and the prospect down the street and you’re not going in and, at least confirming, hey, who’s there, who? The key decision-makers, or a lot of salespeople, when they’re. New. They’re the FNG for a year and two years. And being that new guy, you know, gives you the reason just to drop in. I’m new to the organization, and you have to do that. We’ve all done that. Now, I’m the old guy, not the new guy.

John

Right, I get this a lot because medical sales are very lucrative. You can make it. Most people I talked to their first year out, as long as they’re an average salesperson, or at least doing average work, make them between 60 and 75,000. Is that what you kind of traditionally see? And then, by the end of the second year, they’re making well over six figures. 

We get a lot of questions about medical and pharmaceutical sales and their travel component. What would you tell them if somebody were listening today and considering medicine?

Chuck

You know, when you look at medicine, the mission of medicine is to heal. So, you’re in a market like that. Is it noble, alright? My customers say no one enters a surgery center knowing what will happen. They’re going there to get fixed, and the surgeon, regardless of if it’s a hernia or a torn meniscus rotator cuff, is going when they leave. 

Their body will be fixed. Then they’ve got to go through rehab and stuff. But you are going back to. Medically, there are so many. In so many areas within medicine, you’ve got physician offices, you’ve got surgery centers, you’ve got hospitals, you’ve got urgent care, and you’ve got subspecialties tied to radiology and imaging PT. It was fascinating because if this were to be the conference, there would be about 5,000 exhibitors. I mean, massive companies.

John

Yeah.

Chuck

I mean, with two stories of booze and 75 reps like this, the striker and the Arthrex guys—everybody is there. Is it there because there’s an orthopedic surgeon there? And that’s the fascinating part. 

So, for each position, they create 20 jobs. That includes their staff at their practice, et cetera. But when you look back at all the different device companies, it’s astounding to think that 5000 companies are exhibiting, and everyone brings in anywhere from 5 to 75 reps and salespeople. That’s a lot of horsepower, but everybody’s buying for the attention of the orthopedic surgeon. We’re a small company, and we came here with fairly low expectations, but it’s just engaging talking and recognizing cause and cause.

I’ve been everywhere in the country. I’ve been to 1000 surgery centers nationwide to make a connection.  And with every physician that I talked to because I’ve been there. And a little bit deeper, so you know, hey, so where else do you practice? How are things going? You’ll catch individuals early in their career; they’re just finishing their residency and ready to go. And then you’re talking to documents that are. You. Know. Is there anywhere for 40/55/60 years old during their prime? And then you’ve got others like the guy at Fort Devens who had been in the 10th group. He’s like, He goes. I wish I’d met you ten years ago because he’s retiring next year at 72. And now, but.

John

So, that conference is actually.

Chuck

It’s you. You have to know your story. But more importantly, John. It would be best if you listened and thinking. Listening and thinking—it’s just not a good idea. Hey, here’s my product. Here’s what it does. You have to ask them questions. Listen. And your mind’s constantly going to be tied to it. Alright. You know what? What? What should I talk to him about? And it may not be a lead for me because I’m here representing my company, so it could be—a lead for our rep in Florida. And so, you know, I’m taking notes.

John

Sure.

Chuck

I’m following up and providing Adam with the information that in Florida, hey, talk to doctors. So, he’s opening up a new surgery center. I’m wondering if I’m him. Who else knows this guy? Who else do I need to connect with? They can make an introduction when I’m down to it. Area. Everything’s in here, and it’s constant thinking.

John

This conference is a good one. It’s a good microcosm of what happens in the sales world but in one location. So, if you’re talking about 5,000 surgeons, then you’re talking.

Chuck

5000, there’s five. There are one thousand companies, and I think there are about 7500 surgeons here.

John

Or 7,500 surgeons. And then anywhere from. So, if you look at those 5,000 companies and you say that each company has a minimum of five people, there will be 32,500 people at that conference, right? So that is a ton of noise. And if you look at sales, you take that.

The conference is a picture of sales around the world. It’s very noisy and very busy. So, whether we’re talking about the conference, LinkedIn, or applying for a sales position, how do you stand out amongst all that noise and all that business?

Chuck

In my business, this goes back to the connections in the relationship. And so, I’m at the conference, but I’ve also got other calls. I got a call from the new center in Alaska because I’d worked with this guy eight years ago, and he reached out to me. And said, hey, Chuck, I’m working on a new project. What’s going on? What are you guys doing? You guys did a great job for us at the other place eight years ago. 

So then, for me, it’s gathering intelligence. Alright, because one of the things that we all want to win is every deal. But there are customers we don’t want, and you may not know. Not yet, but there are. It seems like it’s good, and all it is problems. All right, and you learn that the hard way, unfortunately.

But it’s for me; it’s kind of like, hey. That’s my target. Alright, I’ve got to do my battlefield reconnaissance. I’ve got to get my G2, so I know what’s going on, who the players are, who I am competing with, and who else they’re looking at.

So, I could build the case around something that would fit their needs and eliminate the competition. You know, this conference is all about short interactions and information gathering. Who do I talk to? What’s going on? Have you contemplated this? 

And its follow-up because, you know, you’ve got 5-minute interactions with Max at the conference. Sometimes it’s like, hey, alright, alright, have a nice day, but, you know, they don’t make eye contact because then they’ll be sold to, and I get that. Mom is kind of like the kiosk at the airport. Don’t make eye contact with the lady handing out the free cream. So. So, you, you’ve. I get a lot of that. But it’s, hey, what do you do? Are you getting the right information? 

And so, I’ve got a young rep with me at this conference. What comes easy wasn’t easy 30 years ago; it was awkward. It’s time to ask for business. So, we’re all familiar with always being closing. Well, you know, can you issue a PO? When I started, that was my hardest thing, and again and again. Going to my customers, I developed the relationship. I developed trust. And I’d earn the right. I demoed the equipment. Hey. Are you ready to go? 

I need to order five of those. I still remember back in 1993, my first big order. But my boss said, hey, you’ve earned the right and done everything. Now, ask for the business. It’s one of those learned attributes tied to him. On my call with the guys in Alaska yesterday, I didn’t ask for the business because I hadn’t earned it, and I had another call with Him on Friday. 

John

Yeah. It is knowing when they’re out.

Chuck

Yeah, I’ll. I’ll win that. I’ll win that deal. But I’m also wondering, operationally, is that a deal I want to win? I mean, not because of the size and scope, but because it’s small.

John

So. Right.

Chuck

Will I burden my operations team with a center that may be struggling? There are many aspects to consider.

John

Yeah. So, these men and women who are transitioning are there for three to six months. There will be three listeners. They are six months from getting out. What would you tell them after 31 years in sales that they need to be looking at right now as they transition?

Chuck

Be observable, OK, and just watch other people in sales-type situations. This can be, you know if they go to a department store. There is interaction if they visit a restaurant because the server is a salesperson. And if you’re at a restaurant, you’ve got a waiter or waitress that person’s selling. Observe their skills and take into account what they did.

Well, these are just mental notes, and there we go. Wow, that was awesome. When you encounter people who provide great service, thank them. But going back to those guys who are getting out in three to six months pursuing a sales career, I understand that everyone wants to live in a certain place, or maybe I’m going back home. I didn’t go home. My first job was in Kansas City. I’d never been there. And yet, that’s where the job was. 

So, you must be flexible and want to go to different places. As you move up within an organization, kind of being PCs, I mean, it’s the same thing, and I get that we all live in Colorado. For 25 years, that’s good. But my first for.

The rules were all promotions and all required moves. And so being that individual who’s willing to, you know, Travel or move for the position makes you a better candidate. In today’s job market and in our company, everything’s done online, but the resources are tied to it. The feeling that you go into—who do you know? Who are the connections? Who can you reach out to? Can you tell me about that job? 

Because guess what? If you’re applying for a job at a company, you can find individuals with that company on LinkedIn, and you can reach out to them and go. Hey, I’m applying for a job at your company. Can I get 10 minutes on the phone with you?

John

Yes, we teach them that it is so important.

Chuck

Yeah, it’s vital. You know it’s. And then you can find out if, hey, man, where’s the culture good? Or is it a boiler room where, hey, all we do is send out 400 emails every day, and you get burned out, and the turnover is super high? That isn’t very good.

John

Super miserable. Yeah, that’s not for me. Yeah, man. Thanks so much for your time and insight into the sales world. If somebody’s listening to this and wants to get a hold of you, they’re potentially interested in a career in medical sales or working directly with you. What would be the best way?

They should reach out and get in touch.

Chuck

I reached out to me on LinkedIn, and I’ve done the mentoring stuff for people that were introduced to me, like, Hey, Chuck, this individual, and we’re all coaches. I enjoyed doing it. I can’t see that. I can get him a job at our company. Our company is pretty small in terms of sales; we have a sales team of eight. But it is tied to medicine in the different directions you can go, I will say success.

You have to have been successful. It’s not. It’s hard to break in if this is your first sales gig. If you break in, it’s typically at a lower-level company. Still, it’s all about the results you produce that will get you that next promotion at the existing company or another company to recruit you.

Yeah, I’ll. I look forward to helping some of these folks transition, John. The love I provide sometimes is tough, but it’s only because I learned it the hard way.

John

Right, right. That’s awesome, man. The love I provide is stuff. I’m still on that. I’ll give you credit twice, and then it’s mine. Thanks so much, man.

Chuck

Alright, thanks. 

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