Tactical Traveler: S1:E1 | From Military Service to Entrepreneurship with Travis Johnson

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In this episode of the Tactical Traveler podcast, Travis Johnson, a U.S. Navy pilot and podcasting expert, shares his journey as a full-time active-duty Navy pilot and his podcast, the “Nonprofit Architect Podcast.” He shares his experiences with nonprofits, his passion for giving back, and his journey to entrepreneurship. Travis emphasizes the importance of preparing for life after military service, transitioning from an employee to a successful business owner, and diversifying income streams. He provides practical tips for starting a successful podcast.

Highlights:

{01:30} Travis’ Podcast Journey

{02:45} The Journey to Nonprofit Work

{05:30 Balancing Military Service and Entrepreneurship

{10:20} Transitioning from Employee to Business Owner Mentality

{16:45} The Power of Multiple Income Streams

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Travis Johnson Bio:

Travis brings his perspective as a retired Naval Officer, foster kid, murder-attempt survivor, and top-rated host of the Nonprofit Architect Podcast. Travis is the CEO of Podcast Titan, helping your podcast reach the next level through education, podcast production, and mentorship. He is the only professional podcaster with an accredited podcast course. Find out more about Travis.

Links:

https://nonprofitarchitect.org

Sponsored Links:

https://therootbrands.com/product/zero-in

https://newulife.com/hk/en 

https://trufinco.com 

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John

Everybody, welcome to the tactical traveler. I’m excited to be with you guys today, and I have a very special guest who must be blamed for many things in my life.  I have Travis Johnson with us, a podcasting expert and a U.S. Navy pilot Currently on active duty. Right, Travis.

Travis

Currently on active duty. Yes, Sir.

John

Yeah, I wanted to ensure you weren’t in the guard or something. You. I know, so I mean white military service. But you know, it’s kind of that gray area. I say that tongue-in-cheek, but it is your fault that I’m doing this podcast. We connected in a group for veterans; I don’t even remember how we connected. How did we get connected?

Travis

It’s probably in the Vet Primeur tribe.

John

Well, it was in the vet tribe. I’m trying to remember what got me to message you. Oh. I remember you were asking about some travel stuff, and then I sent you some information on Cubs. And then, as we talked to you, you planted this crazy idea in my head about starting my podcast.

Travis

Yep, yep. Yep, it’s my fault. I’m to blame.

John

So, tell me a little bit. This is just a shout-out about your podcast because I have some commonality with you and what you’re doing with your podcast. Tell me why you started it and what it does for you.

Travis

Absolutely. Thanks for asking. I host the nonprofit architect podcast. We interview nonprofit leaders, business leaders, consultants, and people with the special skills to help you do it better to help you build a stronger nonprofit. 

So many people are out there with big intentions, visions, and hearts. But they don’t know exactly how to do the nonprofit stuff. Maybe they don’t have enough business involved. They’re not sure how to integrate everything, so we have fantastic guests who come on and talk about how to do the thing. They talk about their trials or tribulations and how to do what works, and everyone listening to the show and implementing the ideas has had fantastic results. They love everything we’re doing so much that we’ve been ranked #4 in the US. #6 in Canada and top 5 in other countries, and podcast magazine featured us in their 25 veteran-hosted shows.

So, I had a lot of success and had a lot of fun with it, too.

John

Awesome. Now, why the nonprofit route? When you look across the scope of what’s happening in America, typically when people are going to invest the amount of time and energy that you’ve done, I mean, you’ve got guides, you’ve got consulting, you’ve got all this stuff that goes into just being a podcast of kind of your magnitude. 

Why did you go the nonprofit route? 

Travis

You know, growing up before graduating high school, I went through 36 moves, 12 schools, six states, and five foster homes, and survived two murder attempts. But through all that garbage, there was always some personal group, church, or nonprofit willing to help keep us sheltered, clothed, and fed. 

And now that I’m not in a place of scarcity, in survival mode, I’m in a place where I can give back. I want to do that, and I did a lot of nonprofit work while stationed here in Oklahoma City. I was on the board of the Shine Foundation and Books by Vets. 

And then I got stationed in the Kingdom of Bahrain, which those you are listening to might not know. It’s Little Island Nation off the coast of Saudi Arabia in the Persian Gulf. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq, and Iran so surrounded me. But it’s an interesting place to be. 

And I got over there, and I’m like, how am I supposed to do all this great nonprofit stuff I was doing? Someone convinced me, like I convinced you to start your podcast. They said I had this smooth, buttery voice that people would listen to and that I got to have great, fruitful conversations with people in the nonprofit world. How to do stuff. 

So, I view it as my mission now to help the helpers do it better. Maybe that kid that they help today. In 20 years, 30 years might be the next me that comes along, and I appreciate, you know, being grateful for all those who helped me along the way because there’s not a single person out here who does it by themselves. 

So, if I can help them provide better services and have more funding to provide quality programs, that’s what I’m going to do.

John

That’s awesome, man. So, I think a natural next question would be, you’re a full-time active-duty pilot in the Navy. How do you have the time to merge these two lives? And do it so you can still be an expert in both fields.

Travis

That’s a great question because these are not the only two things I’m doing. I’m doing a ton more things, but just blocking out your schedule, doing the things you need to do, knowing what you have to do and when to do it; we don’t watch a lot of TV, we’re we are blocking out the time to ensure we’re doing what we need to grow and do things. Well, if you’re listening to this and you’re still serving, there will be a time when you’re no longer serving. 

And if you’re not working on it, I’m in the Navy. Right. So, part of my day, every day I dedicate to the Navy, I dedicate to my personal and professional development. And I also dedicate. My education and things I need to do post-Navy include building a podcast, building my network, and building this business because one day, the Navy will not be there as my full-time paycheck anymore. I have to be prepared to do that. 

So many people in service do a great job dedicating their lives to service, but when something. The magic happens, right? The military states no longer need or need you, whether you get hurt, sick, or injured. You’re at the end of your enlistment and then to your contract. Or it comes time to retire. There will always be a reason that the military will no longer be your primary life. 

So, if you’re not dedicating some time to ensuring you can succeed in the outside world, I think you’re doing yourself a disservice. You could get in a car wreck tomorrow, which could be all over.

John

Yeah, you know, so I worked as a contractor for the United States Army for 20 years. And one of the things I saw because I had such a tenure there was soldier after soldier who, in two parts, really did not set them up for success, set themselves up for success after they were done. 

The first part was that they invested so much of themselves into their career in the military that they had no identity outside of the military. I’ve watched them as they retired and almost lost their minds because they don’t know who they are anymore without the military. 

And then the second part, which you and I talked about quite a bit, is that they don’t take what they’re doing and look forward far enough to have a side hustle, to have some sort of secondary income that they can start building on a part-time basis until retirement and, you know, so they get out. Then it’s probably different for you as a pilot, but for many of the guys that I work with, they’re shooters, explosive experts, or they’re, you know, medic guys. And now the medic guys always have a job when they get out. 

But for the rest, the choice is between retiring or working a contract in some hellhole overseas. It was never Bahrain.

Travis

Yeah, Bahrain is wonderful. For those of you who are not familiar with other military works, they say you’re sticking in the Middle East. And they say Bahrain, you’re like, oh, well, I guess it will be great then. Well, I mean, just a couple of things clear. 

I’m not a pilot. I’m a naval flight officer. I do mission commander stuff. I run the mission, usually not on the flight deck. So, in my current aircraft, I work 75 feet behind the pedals, the throttle, and stuff, so I don’t have that directly translatable job either. And you know, you see the writing on the walls. For example, when I was enlisted for 12 years, I worked on ejection seats, air conditioning systems, and other things. I got a degree. It was multidisciplinary studies, and I got a job as a naval flight officer that didn’t directly translate. 

And I’m like, you know what? If I don’t start working on it? I will get out of the military, just like you, and talking about and. I did not know where I would end up, and I spent about 15 years learning about personal finance and some different things. I used to run a blog called Warriors Wallet. I helped four hundred families pay off $6 million in debt, helping them take care of their finances once. 

You know, I got my finances screwed up, and I found the holy St. of debt payment Dave Ramsey and wondered why everyone wasn’t doing it. We paid off all our debt, minus our house, a few years ago. We paid off for those of our view who are Dave Ramsey fans.

John

Right.

Travis

Everything up to baby step six, which is to pay off your house, which is the last step besides building wealth and giving things away. But you know our house is less than five years old. We’re being paid off. Suppose some of the things I’m doing and my side hustle with the business rolled in. Podcasting pays off. I’m going to have my house paid off by next December. 

And yeah, it’s wonderful. It’s fantastic, but so many people get wrapped up in that guaranteed paychecks and are addicted to that first and 15th, and it’s hard. It’s hard to make a change. It’s hard to understand. It’s something different. 

You know, one of the things you lose is, is that guaranteed what? One of the things you gain is the ability to collect a bonus check. Work overtime if that’s what you want. That’s what you’re going for? But really, we can design what we want our life to look like. But that only works if we take the steps to make it happen.

John

You know, it’s so funny because you said a couple of things there that are so important, and we get into this mode of service to our country, which I think, you know, based on your tenure and my tenure. I think both of us would agree that that’s honorable and important for everybody who served. Man, just the utmost respect. 

However, we get fed a line of excuse my French, but ******** when we join, whether it be the Navy or the Army or even the Marines, which is that, you know, everything will be so much easier when you get out. And I bring this up because, you know, I served from ‘93 to ‘96. And I did Ranger School airborne school. I did all these cool guy’s schools. 

When I got out, I did my resume, and everybody told me how easy it would be to get a job. When I got out and went to my first job interview after getting out, the guy was looking through my resume and said, “Oh wow, what Forest did you work in? 

I was like, “Forest?” 

He goes. Yeah, it says “US Ranger.” 

And I realized then that I’d lied to you for the better four years. You know? No, the problem with me is I didn’t have a guy like you around, and I was dumb enough to do it twice cause then I served 20 years as a contractor teaching people how to punch people in the face. After all, that’s what I love. 

And when COVID entered that, there was no transferable skill set again, right? And it’s just so important that we listen to what you’re saying today and begin to think about what life looks like after two years, five years, and ten years after 20 years. 

Dave, so you know, I don’t know if you knew this, but Dave Ramsey’s right down the street from us, and He does a ton of stuff for the military, so if you’re not, you know, doing Dave Ramsey stuff, you should be.

Travis

I agree. You know, many people in the military work hard and do amazing things, but they put it all in the service. And if they, you know, get to 20 years of retirement as an allistic guy and you’re in E6, your paycheck, your pensions, 20 grand a year, that’s a $10.00 an hour job. That does not set you up for your future. It takes some pressure off because any job you get plus the 20 grand and potentially plus some disability pay can put you in a really good spot. 

But after 20 years, that’s all you’re getting. That’s not enough. And if you still have, you know, car payments and house payments and loans and all this other BS that we buy that we think we need on along the way, yeah, if we have all that stuff stacked up, well, then you’re not getting a reprieve when you “retire” from the military. You’re jumping right into your next career because you have to.

John

Yes

Travis

Well, the way we’ve designed it, and I did most of the debt payment, getting all our debt paid off when I was still on the list; I was at E5 when I was figuring this stuff out. And, you know, getting rid of our monthly responsibilities or monthly debt that we had to pay off all the time. The things that don’t make us any money. We got rid of all that stuff. We got a very modest house here in Oklahoma City where we could, you know, get in a $400,000 range or more. 

We could have a house at 165 and in Oklahoma City. It gets you a lot of houses; it’s, you know, three bedrooms, two bath, two car garage in a nice neighborhood for 150,000, and that allows us to have a lot of money at the end of the month and allows us to do a lot of different things. I’m at the point now where I can do whatever at the drop of a hat. It is what we want to do because. We’ve designed it that way. We got a car.

John

Right.

Travis

We get it at a decent price and have driven it for ten years. You know our cars are paid off. We paid them off last year. I’ve only had the car for four years or my truck for four years. It’s been paid off for almost a year, and I plan to drive that thing for ten years. Why get sucked up into that payment, or do you want to have something different or whatever? 

The thing is, like, what are you buying? You’re buying something; you’re buying your shackles. And to make yourself feel better, you wonder why you don’t have any money to travel or do anything fun.

John

It’s so wild, too. So, when you look at Dave Ramsey stuff, and you look at what he teaches, and then at some of the other financial experts out there, you know most of those guys aren’t buying their vehicles. They have some business, and they’re leasing that. The vehicle through the business then becomes 100% tax write-off, and they’re not trapped into some four- or five-year depreciation. They are hunks of metal, or I don’t even know if they’re metal composite. 

Yeah, a composite of plastic and, you know, whatever, and I didn’t even know this until recently. I was speaking with a mentor of mine, and I’ve got a truck, and it’s, you know, completely paid for with cash because I always do the used car route. 

And he was like. Why aren’t you leasing? 

And I was like, well, because I don’t want, you know, the responsibility and have this depreciating asset. He goes, dude, lease it in your company name, and it’s a—tax write-off. 

And I was like. What? 

And he goes. Yeah, it’s a 100% tax write-off.

And I was like, holy cow. I never knew that, right? And I will dive into this with you for a second, too. But there’s just such a stark difference in the way that an employee thinks versus the way that is a side hustle. Or a business owner thinks right. 

Travis

Yeah, absolutely.

John

What got you to transition from the employee to the business owner mentality, and why?

Travis

Many things along the way got me interested, sparked the idea, and had me moving towards it, but really, it was reading the four-hour workweek by Tim Ferris that kicked it off for me. He lays it out.

John

What a great book.

Travis

If you read that book, he lays it down in a comical, easy-to-digest, understandable format. You don’t believe you can make it work for yourself; you weren’t reading the book. It is laid out in such a way that should make everyone believe that this is doable in their world. 

And the biggest thing was the mindset. Yeah. I grew up in trailer parks and foster homes. No one in my family was really in business. My uncle, my one uncle, did open an auto shop in his backyard. Right. They built an outbuilding, and he’s got lifts in there. And he does that stuff, but really, he’s built himself a job, right? He hasn’t built himself a business; the same is true with restaurant owner-operators. They haven’t built themselves a business. They built themselves a job. 

So as much, you know, bigger, bigger difference being a business owner than a business manager. When you can become the owner and set something up that works and runs automatically, or you pay a manager to run it for you, or you have equity in a business, you suddenly have money coming in that you’re not actively working for even a lawyer has to come up with billable hours. Same with an engineer. They get paid great money, but the money’s not coming in unless they’re actively working on something. 

And is it the whole idea of not trading dollars for hours? That’s intriguing, like on my site right now. If you go to nonprofitarchitect.org, go to the resources tab. I’ve got some freebies in there. I got some stuff for a buck or two. Then I’ve got the ultimate Podcast guide you mentioned, which got you fired up on this thing here for 27 bucks. 

I go and have a conversation with people I talk about. I am podcasting my guest on a show like this one today, and I encourage you to grab it. This is a free copy of the 15 reasons I believe everyone needs their podcast, especially in business and nonprofits. Grab that for free. Are you going to be on my early mailing list? 

We get a weekly reminder of all the shows that come out on my network. You will, which is no big deal. But if you want to step up, get something like the Ultimate podcast guide. We’re hosting it with E junkie. Anyone can get that at any time of the day. I can wake up and have dollars in my account, and I don’t have to do anything. The whole system is automated. It shows up in your e-mail, and it’s not one of those ebooks that gives you that buyer’s remorse. You know, the ones you pay 15 to $50, you download it, and you’re like, what is this? Garbage is how you feel. You feel like you got immediately ripped off. This thing has at least $300 worth of value, and I priced it at 27 bucks. 

So you can go in there, get valuable, actionable details on how to do this thing full of templates and get every little detail you need to get up. Running, and it only costs you 27 bucks.

John

Yeah, you know, I was sharing with you that I had bought a marketing ebook, and it cost me 100 bucks, and it was a one-page PDF full of absolute crap. Just like, oh, my God. And your guy was not like that. And I mean, I’ve. I’ve organized this entire show off your guide. 

So it’s very practical. Very. Very applicable and easy to follow, you know? So, I read it all in one sitting, and then as I prepare for the next section of what I’m doing with this as I grow the audience, I’m returning to the sections where you talk about it. You know, we were just talking about this just right before we started recording. 

So now it sounds like you’ve done quite a bit of rubber Kiyosaki in your conversation. You kind of laid out his four quadrants of what happens in America with money.

Travis

Yeah. 

I went from being on the system right to having seven streams of income from welfare and food stamps to alimony, Social Security, and all those.

John

I was just saying.

Travis

Things to being in the military, which I’m still getting that government cheese, so to speak, but then getting into my arena where I have something that people can get without interacting with me if they don’t need to, and money just shows up in the account. I hopped on several conferences last week and spoke for an hour each. To a group of nonprofit professionals about why they need a podcast. At the end of the hour, from each hour, I got over 30 contacts, right? 30 warm leads, downloading my ebook, and then I got four sales. 

So, for two hours’ worth of work. I made more than 50 bucks. I mean, where can you go? Where else can you get 50 bucks an hour? Just walking and just creating something. You can’t do it. I hop on the laptop; I jump into a conference. I made over 50 bucks for the two hours I was available. And I mean, where else can you do that?

John

Yeah. Well, I mean, the truth is, unless you’re the doctor, the lawyer, the high-ranking government politician, or an official as an employee, you’re probably not going to make 5060 bucks. Again, unless you’re in one of those specialized fields, but as an entrepreneur, you get to pay yourself whatever you feel you’re worth. 

And that’s one of the things that I love about it. There’s no cap on my income, and I can earn what I want. Yeah. You know, there’s a struggle in it, and like we were talking about just a minute ago, some mind-shift stuff has to happen, along with a change in your thinking. And when you look at what’s happening in our country right now, jobs out there cost 15 bucks an hour. But now unemployment pays you more than 15 bucks an hour.

Travis

Well, 15 bucks an hour is garbage anyway. It’s only 30 grand a year. If you’re worried about the bottom, you’re never going.

John

Yeah, right.

Travis

To get to. The top.

John

Yeah. And it just is wild to me—that instead of taking an ounce of your passion. Being a little coachable, people settle for 15 to 30 bucks an hour instead of creating the dream they’ve always wanted. And I just have. I’ve never quite understood our process in America.

Travis

If you have something you care about that you’re passionate about, it could be Pokémon cards, sports, and how it could be anything you’re interested in. More people on the planet are interested in it, and if you can learn and take what you’ve learned and put it into a product, even if something like a PDF like my podcast guides 47 pages, it’s got legit info. It’s a very quick read, very actionable Intel. You can start making money by putting something together like that End of the week. Would you have to be willing to put something together? That’s not that. That’s not going to give people a bad aftertaste. I’ve bought a couple of those products like you mentioned, and you get, and you’re like, this guy is a joke. 

As always, when you get something for me, no Questions. If you’ve got questions, I must not have put it together. Right. John came to me with a couple of questions, and I added it to the guide so the next person who gets it gets a better product because I do not want to. 

So. Oh, yeah, Travis. I bought his whatever guy, and I can’t, like, I never want a single person to say that. That’s not what I’m doing it for. I’m not. I’m not giving it as a preview. You know, because I want to sell you other stuff. Do I have other stuff to sell? Yeah. You know I’ll do it. You are done with you. Help you get your podcast set up. I’ve got done for your service. I even have production services if that’s what you’re interested in. But I don’t care if you get those things. I care if you can do it and do it successfully and do it yourself. If you need my help, great. I’ll help you out. But you shouldn’t need my help after you get that guy. That’s not the goal. The goal is to give you real value.

John

I don’t want to underplay it, but the guide is so simple that any idiot can do it. You know, it’s like the GEICO commercial, right? You told me to download one app. You know, now I’m. I’m not doing all the post-production and stuff yet because I’m trying to build momentum on the podcast itself. But dude, as you told me, I should run a podcast, and I had my first episode up after I bought the guide three days later.

Travis

Yeah, it can be that quick. The hardest part is deciding to do it, and once you take that first step, you’re like, oh, that isn’t too bad. I can do this. It’s that first over the—hump-like. Oh, I’m not. Sure, how to do things and how podcast editing looks. So many people are putting this stuff up there raw; they may or may not have, but they may have got some decent equipment for me. 

You know, 200/ 300 bucks, and then they just post it live. You don’t have to worry about the editing, the production, and everything if you don’t want to. There are tons of shows out there that are going straight live and don’t care. There’s nothing wrong with that. You can, right? You can do pre-interviews, set up the right equipment, have a production team, or learn how to do it yourself using Audacity. Garage band or a few different products if you want to, but you don’t have to either. There are no rules. You can do whatever you want.

John

Yeah. Well, and mine are not getting out of the head then. You look at Joe Rogan; he does a three-hour podcast. It’s all live like whatever happens – happens.

Travis

Whatever happens, happens, and there’s no rule on length, either. You can hop on there, get on Flash Beat flash briefings, and do something for 2 to 5 minutes. You can do that daily. You can record all of those on one day in 30 minutes and then schedule them to be published. You can do a 5 to 15-minute show that someone can listen to, put on makeup, or shave. You can do a 20 to 40-minute episode that’s more in line with people commuting or working out, or you can do the long diatribes like Joe Rogan or Jocko Willink and do an hour to three and a half six hours worth of content. 

I thought I heard one. I’m probably wrong there, but it doesn’t matter. Like you can. There’s an audience out there for you. A group of people will listen to whatever time you fill up. Mine is not timed. Mine is. You’re on as long as you’re interested in providing value. I’ve had a 9-minute or 12-minute episode, and I’ve had an hour-and-a-half episode. It’s because there’s just so much value in there. And I’m not going to stretch a 9-minute episode into 30. I won’t cut a guy crushing it for an hour and a half. I’m not going to cut him off at 30, so. There are no rules.

John

I used to be a professional MMA fighter and then, you know, started training in the military and hand-to-hand combat. And you know, I had to spend some time doing refereeing, teaching people how to referee, you know, that kind of thing. And guys would always ask me, how do you know when to stand to fight back? Job and I’ve taken the same approach on the podcast: I tell them, hey, look, I’m a professional fighter. If you’re boring me, then you’re boring the uneducated, and I will stand you up and make you restart. 

And that’s kind of the approach I’ve taken with the podcast. It’s kind of like what you’re saying. If it’s 20 minutes, it’s engaging. I’m happy if it’s an hour and we’re engaging and having a good time, then I’m happy, and I had an I had one yesterday, and we got done, and she was like, Oh my God, I was so nervous. What do you think? And I’m like, I had a great. Then she’s like, well, it was pretty long. 

And I’m like, yeah, but I had a good time. I don’t care what anybody else thinks at that point. Cause I had a Good time.

Travis

If you’re interested, if you’re having a good time, it’s going to work.

John

Yeah, right.

Travis

Period. Period. That’s it. You’ve learned the secret of podcasting. It’s interesting and enjoyable. You’re good.

John

Yeah, yeah. And you know, and. And so I’ve seen with my interviews, they’re going, you know, somewhere between 30/45 minutes-ish. And then I’ve got that stuff when doing my travel hacking stuff. 

So down I’m doing that in 10 minutes, and then I’m doing a daily. Daily business kind of motivation thing which takes 5 minutes or so. So, like, it, truly, just like you said, could be anything. It doesn’t matter.

Travis

Yeah, we do. We do the episodes released every Tuesday, and then we take an audiogram; we use a program called Headliner. We put a fancy background and a little squiggly wave line, and we’ve got a little chunk of audio that we released as a preview Friday ahead of time. 

So anyone who subscribed to my nonprofit architect podcast can, every Friday, it’ll pop up and give you, you know, somewhere between 30 seconds and maybe 3 minutes of a little snapshot of the interview. It’s great for your marketing and all of those things if you’re thinking about whether you are a nonprofit or a business or you’re some kind of independent consultant, Travis, but, you know, I just don’t have time for a podcast. 

Look, I understand, but let me ask you: how much time do you put into your social media strategy? How much time do you spend in ways trying to figure out what to post if you’ve got an interview show? And you’ve got ten questions. Well, those ten questions and answers can all be a little audiogram created by the headliner. Grab the guide if you don’t know how to use a headliner. 27 bucks. Please go through how to set up an audiogram you use, Headliner, a free app. It’s not hard to figure out; just a few YouTube videos. I’m sure you can grab those—no big deal. No, but you’ve got. You’ve now got content. If you do a weekly show, you have five posts for the morning and five for the afternoon. 

You don’t have to create anything; it’s already done for you. It’s an interview show where you ask questions and make the guest decide what to say. They’ve got to come up with all the answers, you know.

You don’t have to figure out what you’re posting if you take no kidding. For every question and answer, you can take that in an audiogram, and now you’ve got your post for the week, and you don’t have to do any other work.

John

Even since you and I talked, a wealth of information about podcasting could enable anybody to become a semi-expert in a few days. I thought about these interviews and getting people kinds of travel or business and entrepreneurial stories. I just downloaded the questions. I just typed in top travel questions and some of those things. And there’s your there’s your questions for the interview. And then I just. Let you talk.

Travis

Well, I’ve got a couple of things out there. If you want to start your podcast, we want to help you get started either with the podcast guide or the Services. Suppose that’s up your alley. Let us know if you have a budget for something like that, and we help you start on the right foot. 

The podcast guy has done so well that we’re becoming a course we’ve hooked up. With a small college, they’ve hooked up with a couple of universities. They create courses professionally, and the Ultimate Podcast Guide will become a no-kidding university-level course with regional accreditation.

 So when this comes live, you can take my course and get no kid in college credit at the University of San Diego, Colorado State.

John

Oh wow.

Travis

University or the Forbes Business School out of the University of Arizona. So big things are coming down the line, and I’m looking to get that into a few more colleges. In universities, as time goes on, but very excited for that coming up, if you already do host your show and you are in the nonprofit space or are a veteran, we have at nonprofitarchitect.org, there’s a little tab to click on the nonprofit podcast network or the veteran podcast network. 

Now, I love helping the helpers. And those are free to sign. Once you sign up, we throw it up on the website there, and then every show you publish goes out with our weekly e-mail. So, you instantly have access to our entire audience, which is a wonderful feature. There will eventually be a freemium service, which you could pay for to get extras, but getting on the page is free. All day, every day.

John

Cool, alright, so I got another question for you. So and, I know this because of a conversation you and I had. But how do you determine? When you’re going to post a particular episode or interview of your podcast because, you know, as we were talking when I was talking with you, you’re like, yeah, this sometime in September. So do you just put them in the hopper, do the interviews, and then put them out in order? Or do you have, like, a methodology that you use?

Travis

I don’t have a specific methodology. I roughly release them in order. Some people have something they’re trying to promote. They want to jump up the list, and I will let them pay for the privilege. I like to keep it scheduled. I do want a week. Some people do a Daily Show. Some people do bimonthly, but they do two shows a month. Some people do monthly. There’s no Rhyme or reason for which one is better or worse as a host. The more frequently you do interviews, the better host you become. But like we did our interview, was it this week or last week? It was probably last week. I’ve got them in a Google Drive folder. And I put dates on the backside up for more. They’re going to be released, so I can make sure I do my due diligence, make sure they get the promos out, make sure the guests are sharing that in their e-mail list, and then when the interview goes live, I send them a follow-up interview that has all the links to everywhere you can find Show where you can. I give them the embed code so they can put it on their website. 

So, when this comes live, I’ll use that embed code on my page so everyone can see my interview with you. It helps build SEO and credibility and all that fun stuff. So, you’ll be on my page when this thing goes live. 

Also, please give them a sample e-mail template they can use in MailChimp, Constant Contact, or whatever. They just copy and paste that over, and when they send it out to their e-mail. It’s all done for them. Something else I do is meet with everyone I talk to. I sent him a follow-up e-mail with suggested episodes to help them through their struggles. 

So, everyone I talked to got a list of three to seven helpful episodes, which became part of my marketing solution. They’re out there. Showing and sharing what they’ve heard from me, so it’s also pretty interesting.

John

That’s great. Alright, man, well, listen.

Travis

A nonprofit architect podcast is the best way to reach me. I’m on every channel we care about: LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Reddit, Pinterest. If you can put the nonprofit architect in, I will come up with one of those. You can go to nonprofitarchitect.org, see all the stuff we’ve got available, and join us. Podcast networks for nonprofits and veterans pick up the guide—also, a nonprofitarchitect.org. Suppose you have to send an e-mail to nonprofitarchitect@gmail.com.

John

Awesome man. Well, I made sure to put that in the podcast notes, and I sent you the link so you can embed it. Well, so that’s the. Trick: I just figured out I haven’t gotten that far in the guide yet.

Travis

It’s in there.

John

Cool. Well, man, thanks for your time. We’ll chat soon.

Travis

Yeah. Thanks so much for having me on. I enjoyed it, John.

More from Titan Evolution Podcast

Check out all of our interviews: https://titanevolutionpodcast.com/blog/

Connect with Travis: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nonprofitarchitect/

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